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Senser released from prison, now on work release

StarTribune Mpls News - 3 hours 30 min ago
The wife of former Minnesota Viking Joe Senser is being allowed to reduce by nearly six months the time she was to serve in prison.

Man fatally shot in north Minneapolis residence

StarTribune Mpls News - 6 hours 44 min ago
The victim was shot early Thursday and was declared dead at the scene.

U unveils its ultra-tech nano lab

StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-23 21:28
Director of the Minnesota Nano Center says, “This is the best equipment in the world.”

Mpls.' Super Bowl bid will go to NFL owners on iPads

StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-23 20:59
Minneapolis is in the running for the 2018 game, along with New Orleans and Indianapolis.

New Minneapolis auditor may be hired by September

StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-23 16:17
Don't expect to see many audits coming out of City Hall this year.

Driver was drunk, going nearly 100 when he killed 2 in Minneapolis pileup, charges say

StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-23 15:46
Test results showed the defendant’s blood alcohol content at the time was 0.18 percent.

Minneapolis council member Blong Yang, on 100 days in office: "Don't lose faith in government"

Margo Ashmore North News

Fifth Ward Council Member Blong Yang told NorthNews the most surprising aspect of his new job is how much hard work it is. He said there are lots of meetings with developers and business people, though he is, at 100 days in office, getting a chance to tackle the agendas on which he ran, and hoping to hear more from resident constituents.

On April 17 Yang sponsored a morning-long summit on Bringing Broadway Back (see related article), and on Thursday, April 24 he will host a summit on Affordable Housing from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Shiloh Temple, 1201 West Broadway. RSVP is appreciated to Yer Yang at 612-673-2205. The post card for the event says the aim is “to hear your voice on how to fill vacant houses and empty lots with homeowners and development. Members from the community, non-profits, developers and the City of Minneapolis have been invited to speak.”

The two summits are “my way of connecting to ask the community how to move forward. Those were my two issues, outside of public safety,” Yang said. “In the first couple weeks people called asking ‘can I build this?’ and I thought, ‘do I even have this power?’ The amount of power a council member can have is ridiculous. I didn’t even know how to respond to this,” Yang said. With all sorts of different development ideas he said it would not be good to “Frankenstein” West Broadway.

Yang said he’s having to learn patience, and to figure out how to get things done in the bureaucracy. For example, 26th Avenue North “is awful, I’ve been screaming to everybody but nothing is going to happen until next year.” He’s having to pay attention to decisions that may seem isolated to other wards but actually impact the Fifth Ward by the precedents they set, such as the debate over historic buildings in Dinkytown or the Southwest Minneapolis building moratorium.

Recent StarTribune articles about different areas of town being treated differently have underscored work to be done to bring equity across the city, Yang said. The Northside is treated differently on potholes, street lights, and towing during snow emergencies; the newspaper reported that the towing contractors do not go south of a certain boundary. “We make tough decisions about where money should go, we have to equalize so all are served well. This is where rhetoric meets reality.”

About getting things done, while not necessarily aligned with her, Yang says it has been “enlightening to work with Barb Johnson,” Fourth Ward Council Member and Council President. “She is masterful, that comes from her years of experience and with her mom,” former Council President Alice Rainville.

He says he is independent in his thinking and has “gone against the grain a bit.” During the campaign and now, he said he’s been fortunate to have a group of former elected officials to consult, Paul Ostrow and Joe Biernat among them. Current colleagues “don’t know where to pinpoint me,” or predict what he’s going to do, Yang said.

About the upcoming vote on Southwest Light Rail Transit, Yang said “it will be tough to vote against light rail transit as it is. North Minneapolis feels the need for the connection to jobs,” though the line as it’s configured only has two stops in Ward 5 and one just outside. “How to connect those who live way above the line?”

About crime and safety: “We do need to increase the police force. We’re budgeted for 850 officers, we have around 800 now,” and with retirements happening, the city could be down to the high 700s. To replenish the force through new recruits could take 12-18 months, so for the first time in a long time the city is hiring experienced officers from other jurisdictions.

The fire department is also down by about 30 people, and is a smaller force than Saint Paul’s, “and we have a bigger city.”

Leadership in several key city departments changed recently, and the city will have a new head of Community Planning and Economic Development, and new City Coordinator yet to be named.

Constituents, residents, are welcome to contact Yang’s office. He and staff Niki Mitchell and Yer (Ger) Yang are all at 612-673-2205. While he alluded to it being a tough transition to needing to let his staff “do the heavy lifting” on researching issues, only “10 to 20 percent” of the people he meets with are constituents, so “I’m so excited when they show up. They are the most important. I think it’s my job, and I would love to see more people from the ward show up.”

In this area of low voter turnout, there are barriers to engaging in government that Yang would like to break down. He said he’s enjoyed meeting with people whom he knows didn’t vote for him, and “seeing how we can make it better for them.” A person does not hold a grudge, for the good of the Ward, he said. “I’m a person they didn’t expect would show up and win.”

“I was at a book club recently. A lot of middle-aged white women who said they had lost faith in government in general. If they don’t have faith, what about others who have less?” Yang asked. “My goal is to move the dial up so there is more faith in government.”

“I’m an average Joe,” Yang said. “I’m not that different, outside of my race. The message I would like to leave with people is don’t lose faith in government. I am really open to listening to constituents. We want to do that. Make calls, send emails. Everything will work out well by having common faith.”

Fifth Ward Council Member Blong Yang told NorthNews the most surprising aspect of his new job is how much hard work it is. He said there are lots of meetings with developers and business people, though he is, at 100 days in office, getting a chance to tackle the agendas on which he ran, and hoping to hear more from resident constituents.

On April 17 Yang sponsored a morning-long summit on Bringing Broadway Back (see related article), and on Thursday, April 24 he will host a summit on Affordable Housing from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Shiloh Temple, 1201 West Broadway. RSVP is appreciated to Yer Yang at 612-673-2205. The post card for the event says the aim is “to hear your voice on how to fill vacant houses and empty lots with homeowners and development. Members from the community, non-profits, developers and the City of Minneapolis have been invited to speak.”

The two summits are “my way of connecting to ask the community how to move forward. Those were my two issues, outside of public safety,” Yang said. “In the first couple weeks people called asking ‘can I build this?’ and I thought, ‘do I even have this power?’ The amount of power a council member can have is ridiculous. I didn’t even know how to respond to this,” Yang said. With all sorts of different development ideas he said it would not be good to “Frankenstein” West Broadway.

Yang said he’s having to learn patience, and to figure out how to get things done in the bureaucracy. For example, 26th Avenue North “is awful, I’ve been screaming to everybody but nothing is going to happen until next year.” He’s having to pay attention to decisions that may seem isolated to other wards but actually impact the Fifth Ward by the precedents they set, such as the debate over historic buildings in Dinkytown or the Southwest Minneapolis building moratorium.

Recent StarTribune articles about different areas of town being treated differently have underscored work to be done to bring equity across the city, Yang said. The Northside is treated differently on potholes, street lights, and towing during snow emergencies; the newspaper reported that the towing contractors do not go south of a certain boundary. “We make tough decisions about where money should go, we have to equalize so all are served well. This is where rhetoric meets reality.”

About getting things done, while not necessarily aligned with her, Yang says it has been “enlightening to work with Barb Johnson,” Fourth Ward Council Member and Council President. “She is masterful, that comes from her years of experience and with her mom,” former Council President Alice Rainville.

He says he is independent in his thinking and has “gone against the grain a bit.” During the campaign and now, he said he’s been fortunate to have a group of former elected officials to consult, Paul Ostrow and Joe Biernat among them. Current colleagues “don’t know where to pinpoint me,” or predict what he’s going to do, Yang said.

About the upcoming vote on Southwest Light Rail Transit, Yang said “it will be tough to vote against light rail transit as it is. North Minneapolis feels the need for the connection to jobs,” though the line as it’s configured only has two stops in Ward 5 and one just outside. “How to connect those who live way above the line?”

About crime and safety: “We do need to increase the police force. We’re budgeted for 850 officers, we have around 800 now,” and with retirements happening, the city could be down to the high 700s. To replenish the force through new recruits could take 12-18 months, so for the first time in a long time the city is hiring experienced officers from other jurisdictions.

The fire department is also down by about 30 people, and is a smaller force than Saint Paul’s, “and we have a bigger city.”

Leadership in several key city departments changed recently, and the city will have a new head of Community Planning and Economic Development, and new City Coordinator yet to be named.

Constituents, residents, are welcome to contact Yang’s office. He and staff Niki Mitchell and Yer (Ger) Yang are all at 612-673-2205. While he alluded to it being a tough transition to needing to let his staff “do the heavy lifting” on researching issues, only “10 to 20 percent” of the people he meets with are constituents, so “I’m so excited when they show up. They are the most important. I think it’s my job, and I would love to see more people from the ward show up.”

In this area of low voter turnout, there are barriers to engaging in government that Yang would like to break down. He said he’s enjoyed meeting with people whom he knows didn’t vote for him, and “seeing how we can make it better for them.” A person does not hold a grudge, for the good of the Ward, he said. “I’m a person they didn’t expect would show up and win.”

“I was at a book club recently. A lot of middle-aged white women who said they had lost faith in government in general. If they don’t have faith, what about others who have less?” Yang asked. “My goal is to move the dial up so there is more faith in government.”

“I’m an average Joe,” Yang said. “I’m not that different, outside of my race. The message I would like to leave with people is don’t lose faith in government. I am really open to listening to constituents. We want to do that. Make calls, send emails. Everything will work out well by having common faith.”

    People’s Gallery on University in St. Paul welcomes local artists

    The People’s Gallery is ready for action.

    Situated on University Avenue between Highway 280 and Raymond Avenue, the gallery features the work of local artists. Paintings, photographs, digital prints, poetry and photo-collages fill the space and flood the senses, yet the gallery is intimate and feels homey.

    The welcoming vibe at 2496 W. University Ave. is an outgrowth of the energy shared among the members of Crooked River Creations, the collective that operates the gallery: photographer Bob Alberti, photographer and musician Ayanna Muata, writer and poet Theresa Jarosz Alberti and multimedia artist Gennie Alberti.

    Theresa and Bob are married, Gennie is their daughter, and Ayanna quips that she’s a “long-lost cousin.” Spend five minutes with this group, and their familial connection is palpable.

    A few years ago, when Bob and Ayanna first met, they began kicking around the idea of an art collective.

    “We initially talked about our desires to be more creative and decided that it was time to not just talk about it, but be more proactive,” Ayanna said.

    Originally from Chicago, Ayanna works as a library manager at William Mitchell College of Law.

    “My kids were in college and high school,” she said, “and I was thinking, ‘What else do I need to do?’ I’d worked for nonprofits and in schools but always felt that I needed to push something out creative.”

    This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

    Bob, who spent his youth in Queens, N.Y., and outstate Minnesota, has worked for more than 30 years in information technology. He needed more artistic outlets in his life, he said.

    “I was getting restless and wanted to focus more on my photography,” he said. “I’m also part of a comedy group called Vilification Tennis, so every month I perform at Bryant-Lake Bowl.”

    Theresa, who grew up in Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center, has published her first book of poetry, (After) Confession, which is for sale at the People’s Gallery. The book is about family, growing up Catholic and life, she said.

    Once they decided to form their collective, the first goal was to find a space.

    “It had to be close enough to our respective homes [they live just across the river in Minneapolis] so we could get to it, and it needed growth potential,” said Ayanna.

    Initially, they began working and having shows in a space they called B4 the Door Gallery in the back of the building, but the space is hidden from the street.

    “As we came in and out of the building, we noticed the empty store front adjacent to B4,” Theresa said. They moved into that space, and now the People’s Gallery has 1,200 square feet with an entrance on University Avenue. The gallery recently closed a show called Color the Winter, an idea that Gennie conceived.

    “We issued a call to artists, which was hugely successful,” Ayanna said.

    In time, the group wants to have a six-week rotation of artists and is encouraging artists to contact them about future shows.

    “The more people we can engage and bring into our house, the more we can have an ongoing dialogue about what impacts us as artists,” Ayanna said. “We want to know other artists, and the community at large, because we need the community to not just survive, but to thrive.”

    Gennie, who recently graduated from the University of Minnesota’s art program, says the gallery is important to her as an emerging artist.

    “I’m just coming into the arts community, and this is a great opportunity to meet people and keep in contact,” she said. “Also, it’s exciting to tell my friends—and fellow artists—that, if they need a space to do a poetry reading, for example, they should check us out. We have a gallery!”

    When the Green Line opens in June on University Avenue, the collective is expecting an infusion of energy to the area. And they are brainstorming an upcoming show with a working title of “Love Train” To mark the launch of the new light rail.

    “We’ll see even more foot traffic and are looking forward to growing,” Bob said. “We want the gallery to be a place where people come to be part of the community—a neighborhood hub. Besides art, we have hosted poetry readings, musical shows and dance events.”

    Ayanna said people should come to view the art but also to engage and participate in it. “No elite art vibe going on here, and that’s why we call it the People’s Gallery,” she said. “Everyone who comes in the door is part of the People’s Gallery.”

    The People’s Gallery is open by appointment (call 612-961-0507 or email //crc [at] peoplesgallery [dot] org">crc [at] peoplesgallery [dot] org) or check out their calendar at peoplesgallery.org.

    They also maintain a Facebook page at www.facebook.com/peoplesgallerybyPMI. You can see Ayanna’s work at waningmoondigitalimages.zenfolio.com and Theresa’s work at penandmoon.com.

    The People’s Gallery is ready for action.

    Situated on University Avenue between Highway 280 and Raymond Avenue, the gallery features the work of local artists. Paintings, photographs, digital prints, poetry and photo-collages fill the space and flood the senses, yet the gallery is intimate and feels homey.

    The welcoming vibe at 2496 W. University Ave. is an outgrowth of the energy shared among the members of Crooked River Creations, the collective that operates the gallery: photographer Bob Alberti, photographer and musician Ayanna Muata, writer and poet Theresa Jarosz Alberti and multimedia artist Gennie Alberti.

    Theresa and Bob are married, Gennie is their daughter, and Ayanna quips that she’s a “long-lost cousin.” Spend five minutes with this group, and their familial connection is palpable.

    A few years ago, when Bob and Ayanna first met, they began kicking around the idea of an art collective.

    “We initially talked about our desires to be more creative and decided that it was time to not just talk about it, but be more proactive,” Ayanna said.

    Originally from Chicago, Ayanna works as a library manager at William Mitchell College of Law.

    “My kids were in college and high school,” she said, “and I was thinking, ‘What else do I need to do?’ I’d worked for nonprofits and in schools but always felt that I needed to push something out creative.”

    This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

    Bob, who spent his youth in Queens, N.Y., and outstate Minnesota, has worked for more than 30 years in information technology. He needed more artistic outlets in his life, he said.

    “I was getting restless and wanted to focus more on my photography,” he said. “I’m also part of a comedy group called Vilification Tennis, so every month I perform at Bryant-Lake Bowl.”

    Theresa, who grew up in Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center, has published her first book of poetry, (After) Confession, which is for sale at the People’s Gallery. The book is about family, growing up Catholic and life, she said.

    Once they decided to form their collective, the first goal was to find a space.

    “It had to be close enough to our respective homes [they live just across the river in Minneapolis] so we could get to it, and it needed growth potential,” said Ayanna.

    Initially, they began working and having shows in a space they called B4 the Door Gallery in the back of the building, but the space is hidden from the street.

    “As we came in and out of the building, we noticed the empty store front adjacent to B4,” Theresa said. They moved into that space, and now the People’s Gallery has 1,200 square feet with an entrance on University Avenue. The gallery recently closed a show called Color the Winter, an idea that Gennie conceived.

    “We issued a call to artists, which was hugely successful,” Ayanna said.

    In time, the group wants to have a six-week rotation of artists and is encouraging artists to contact them about future shows.

    “The more people we can engage and bring into our house, the more we can have an ongoing dialogue about what impacts us as artists,” Ayanna said. “We want to know other artists, and the community at large, because we need the community to not just survive, but to thrive.”

    Gennie, who recently graduated from the University of Minnesota’s art program, says the gallery is important to her as an emerging artist.

    “I’m just coming into the arts community, and this is a great opportunity to meet people and keep in contact,” she said. “Also, it’s exciting to tell my friends—and fellow artists—that, if they need a space to do a poetry reading, for example, they should check us out. We have a gallery!”

    When the Green Line opens in June on University Avenue, the collective is expecting an infusion of energy to the area. And they are brainstorming an upcoming show with a working title of “Love Train” To mark the launch of the new light rail.

    “We’ll see even more foot traffic and are looking forward to growing,” Bob said. “We want the gallery to be a place where people come to be part of the community—a neighborhood hub. Besides art, we have hosted poetry readings, musical shows and dance events.”

    Ayanna said people should come to view the art but also to engage and participate in it. “No elite art vibe going on here, and that’s why we call it the People’s Gallery,” she said. “Everyone who comes in the door is part of the People’s Gallery.”

    The People’s Gallery is open by appointment (call 612-961-0507 or email //crc [at] peoplesgallery [dot] org">crc [at] peoplesgallery [dot] org) or check out their calendar at peoplesgallery.org.

    They also maintain a Facebook page at www.facebook.com/peoplesgallerybyPMI. You can see Ayanna’s work at waningmoondigitalimages.zenfolio.com and Theresa’s work at penandmoon.com.

    © 2014 Park Bugle

      St. Paul District 12 zoning proposal meets opposition

      Kristal Leebrick

      The St. Anthony Park Community Council has tabled a proposal to change the zoning code in north St. Anthony Park to allow additional dwelling units to be built on single-family lots. The council is considering creating an ad hoc committee or task force to study housing density in District 12 and hear neighbors’ views about the zoning proposal.

      Nearly two dozen residents attended the community council’s regular meeting on April 10 to express their opposition to zoning code changes in the neighborhood. The council had not planned to review any zoning proposal on April 10 but had intended to hear a report from the District 12 Land Use Committee, which met the week before.

      The Land Use Committee was to hear a proposal on April 3 by the Land Use Efficiency interest group (not an official committee of the District 12 Community Council) to change the zoning code to allow property owners to build additional dwelling units—small separate units or attached additions to an existing home. The units could provide living space for aging parents, caregivers or seniors looking to downsize but stay on their property, proponents say.

      More than 60 residents crowded into the meeting space at South St. Anthony Rec Center on April 3 to state their opposition to or support of the proposal.

      This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

      The Land Use Committee did not review the proposal that night but instead allowed the crowd to give statements and ask questions about the proposal and the community council process in St. Paul.

      The Land Use Efficiency interest group is part of a larger initiative in District 12 called Transition Town ASAP. A group of residents formed Transition Town ASAP in 2013 to look at ways residents of St. Anthony Park could reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. The initiative established nine working groups tasked with projects that include establishing communal solar power grids, sustainable gardening and food production, transportation and land use efficiency.

      Land Use Efficiency group members met one-on-one with several dozen area residents in August and September 2013 to assess interest in pursuing a zoning change to allow accessory dwellings on properties currently zoned as single-family. The group also conducted two public meetings, in November and in January, at Luther Seminary. The group’s draft ordinance was made public in late March and is posted on the District 12 website at sapcc.org/adus.

      Residents interested in being involved in a group that would examine the issue should send an email to Amy Sparks, District 12 executive director, at amy [at] sapcc [dot] org.

      The St. Anthony Park Community Council has tabled a proposal to change the zoning code in north St. Anthony Park to allow additional dwelling units to be built on single-family lots. The council is considering creating an ad hoc committee or task force to study housing density in District 12 and hear neighbors’ views about the zoning proposal.

      Nearly two dozen residents attended the community council’s regular meeting on April 10 to express their opposition to zoning code changes in the neighborhood. The council had not planned to review any zoning proposal on April 10 but had intended to hear a report from the District 12 Land Use Committee, which met the week before.

      The Land Use Committee was to hear a proposal on April 3 by the Land Use Efficiency interest group (not an official committee of the District 12 Community Council) to change the zoning code to allow property owners to build additional dwelling units—small separate units or attached additions to an existing home. The units could provide living space for aging parents, caregivers or seniors looking to downsize but stay on their property, proponents say.

      More than 60 residents crowded into the meeting space at South St. Anthony Rec Center on April 3 to state their opposition to or support of the proposal.

      This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

      The Land Use Committee did not review the proposal that night but instead allowed the crowd to give statements and ask questions about the proposal and the community council process in St. Paul.

      The Land Use Efficiency interest group is part of a larger initiative in District 12 called Transition Town ASAP. A group of residents formed Transition Town ASAP in 2013 to look at ways residents of St. Anthony Park could reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. The initiative established nine working groups tasked with projects that include establishing communal solar power grids, sustainable gardening and food production, transportation and land use efficiency.

      Land Use Efficiency group members met one-on-one with several dozen area residents in August and September 2013 to assess interest in pursuing a zoning change to allow accessory dwellings on properties currently zoned as single-family. The group also conducted two public meetings, in November and in January, at Luther Seminary. The group’s draft ordinance was made public in late March and is posted on the District 12 website at sapcc.org/adus.

      Residents interested in being involved in a group that would examine the issue should send an email to Amy Sparks, District 12 executive director, at amy [at] sapcc [dot] org.

      © 2014 Park Bugle

        15 for its 15th: Saint Anthony Park Community Foundation to host grant challenge to improve neighborhood

        In honor of its 15th anniversary, the Saint Anthony Park Community Foundation is hosting a $15,000 grant challenge. The competition will open May 11 with an announcement at the special Music in the Park/Community Foundation anniversary concerts featuring the New Standards.

        Foundation grants chair Bruce Weber said the board decided to celebrate 15 years as a granting organization by inviting the community to come up with ideas to improve St. Anthony Park.

        “We wanted to challenge our existing nonprofits as well as individual neighbors to think longer term about what makes this community great and how we can support new ideas to keep it that way,” he said.

        To encourage that long-range creativity, the $15,000 will be paid out over three years with the first $5,000 awarded this fall.

        Jon Schumacher, the foundation’s longtime executive director, hopes the competition sparks the creative imagination of all neighbors and breathes some fresh air into the granting process.

        This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

        “I think we can sometimes get in a bit of a rut around our annual grant cycle,” Schumacher stated. “This is a chance to do something different and really get the community involved in the process.”

        The competition is open to any individual or group that serves the District 12 area of St. Paul. Submissions will be accepted from May 11 to July 31. At that time, the foundation board will select the top three entries based on the following criteria: originality, degree of impact and feasibility of implementation.

        Those three entries will be made public Aug. 11 and community members will have a chance to vote for their favorite until Aug. 31. The winner will be announced at the foundation’s anniversary party scheduled for Friday, Sept. 19. Application forms and information are available on the foundation’s website at sapfoundation.org.

        The organization’s 15th anniversary is a chance to honor the entire community, said Erica Schumacher, the foundation’s board chair.

        “Thanks to the generosity of our neighbors and business community, we have been able to award more than $400,000 in grants to support our neighborhood schools and nonprofits,” she said. “Add to that our growing endowment fund and the community-building efforts of our executive director, and we feel there’s a lot to celebrate.”

        In honor of its 15th anniversary, the Saint Anthony Park Community Foundation is hosting a $15,000 grant challenge. The competition will open May 11 with an announcement at the special Music in the Park/Community Foundation anniversary concerts featuring the New Standards.

        Foundation grants chair Bruce Weber said the board decided to celebrate 15 years as a granting organization by inviting the community to come up with ideas to improve St. Anthony Park.

        “We wanted to challenge our existing nonprofits as well as individual neighbors to think longer term about what makes this community great and how we can support new ideas to keep it that way,” he said.

        To encourage that long-range creativity, the $15,000 will be paid out over three years with the first $5,000 awarded this fall.

        Jon Schumacher, the foundation’s longtime executive director, hopes the competition sparks the creative imagination of all neighbors and breathes some fresh air into the granting process.

        This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

        “I think we can sometimes get in a bit of a rut around our annual grant cycle,” Schumacher stated. “This is a chance to do something different and really get the community involved in the process.”

        The competition is open to any individual or group that serves the District 12 area of St. Paul. Submissions will be accepted from May 11 to July 31. At that time, the foundation board will select the top three entries based on the following criteria: originality, degree of impact and feasibility of implementation.

        Those three entries will be made public Aug. 11 and community members will have a chance to vote for their favorite until Aug. 31. The winner will be announced at the foundation’s anniversary party scheduled for Friday, Sept. 19. Application forms and information are available on the foundation’s website at sapfoundation.org.

        The organization’s 15th anniversary is a chance to honor the entire community, said Erica Schumacher, the foundation’s board chair.

        “Thanks to the generosity of our neighbors and business community, we have been able to award more than $400,000 in grants to support our neighborhood schools and nonprofits,” she said. “Add to that our growing endowment fund and the community-building efforts of our executive director, and we feel there’s a lot to celebrate.”

        © 2014 Park Bugle

          St. Anthony Park Area Seniors wants to know what seniors want

          St. Anthony Park Area Seniors is launching a study with a Wilder Foundation research team to find out what prospective clients may want from the organization.

          St. Anthony Park Area Seniors (SAPAS) began as the St. Anthony Park Block Nurse Program in 1981 with the aim of helping seniors stay in their homes.

          But health care services have changed and many of the nursing and home-health pieces of the program have been taken over by other medical and social organizations. Now, the group is looking for new ways to serve the community with social and support services.

          SAPAS plans to ask baby boomers and beyond what they would like to see offered during a series of focus group meetings that will meet in May and June. The focus groups will be led by SAPAS board members.

          There will be eight groups: four for north St. Anthony Park residents and one each for Lauderdale-Falcon Heights, south St. Anthony Park, area businesses and key informants such as St. Anthony Park Library staff.

          This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

          SAPAS still offers services for seniors, including exercise classes, rides to health care appointments, Meals on Wheels and many social activities. (A complete listing may be found at sapaseniors.org) But SAPAS board chair Mary Beck said there are other possibilities that have not been explored, such as yoga classes, book groups, travel opportunities and neighborhood locations for university classes.

          People may want help negotiating the Medicare maze, finding caregiving or caregiver respite services, or dealing with the transition from full-time work to retirement. The possibilities are endless, Beck said.

          SAPAS will present results at a neighborhood forum on Sept. 16. Anyone interested in being part of the focus groups should call Beck at 651-644-2816.

          St. Anthony Park Area Seniors is launching a study with a Wilder Foundation research team to find out what prospective clients may want from the organization.

          St. Anthony Park Area Seniors (SAPAS) began as the St. Anthony Park Block Nurse Program in 1981 with the aim of helping seniors stay in their homes.

          But health care services have changed and many of the nursing and home-health pieces of the program have been taken over by other medical and social organizations. Now, the group is looking for new ways to serve the community with social and support services.

          SAPAS plans to ask baby boomers and beyond what they would like to see offered during a series of focus group meetings that will meet in May and June. The focus groups will be led by SAPAS board members.

          There will be eight groups: four for north St. Anthony Park residents and one each for Lauderdale-Falcon Heights, south St. Anthony Park, area businesses and key informants such as St. Anthony Park Library staff.

          This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

          SAPAS still offers services for seniors, including exercise classes, rides to health care appointments, Meals on Wheels and many social activities. (A complete listing may be found at sapaseniors.org) But SAPAS board chair Mary Beck said there are other possibilities that have not been explored, such as yoga classes, book groups, travel opportunities and neighborhood locations for university classes.

          People may want help negotiating the Medicare maze, finding caregiving or caregiver respite services, or dealing with the transition from full-time work to retirement. The possibilities are endless, Beck said.

          SAPAS will present results at a neighborhood forum on Sept. 16. Anyone interested in being part of the focus groups should call Beck at 651-644-2816.

          © 2014 Park Bugle

            COMMUNITY VOICES | Love Loring shows off the Loring Park Community

            jakre Community Voices

            Love Loring, an annual fundraiser organized by the Citizens for a Loring Park Community, featured music, food, a silent auction, and an opportunity for community members to get together and talk about neighborhood issues. The event, held on April 10th at the Woman's Club of Minneapolis, was also dedicated to long-time neighborhood volunteer Gary Gliem, who passed away late last year.

            Here's a look at the event [above].

            Love Loring, an annual fundraiser organized by the Citizens for a Loring Park Community, featured music, food, a silent auction, and an opportunity for community members to get together and talk about neighborhood issues. The event, held on April 10th at the Woman's Club of Minneapolis, was also dedicated to long-time neighborhood volunteer Gary Gliem, who passed away late last year.

            Here's a look at the event [above].

            © 2014 John Akre

              Minneapolis adds many more sirens to tornado warning system

              StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-23 13:03
              Residents and others in Minneapolis will hear the new sirens twice Thursday, at 1:45 p.m. and 6:55 p.m., during statewide tornado drills.

              Growth forecast sprouts conflict as cities vie for development dollars

              StarTribune Mpls News - Tue, 2014-04-22 21:27
              The Met Council plan envisions growth on edges of the metro area, but Minneapolis officials disagree.

              Gun cases jump 40% in Minneapolis in 2013

              StarTribune Mpls News - Tue, 2014-04-22 21:04
              Incidents part of a Minneapolis report also showing increase in cellphone thefts, response times.

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