Feed aggregator

Computers, markers and mind power coordinate stadium construction

StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 23:18
The Dome demolition and construction of the supersized $1 billion Minnesota Multipurpose Stadium are being orchestrated with state-of-the-art computer programs and the mind of the impishly gruff project manager.

Wheelage tax dollars to help whittle Hennepin, Ramsey road work

StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 21:52
New surcharge on vehicle registrations will allow Hennepin, Ramsey to tackle backlog of road projects.

Minneapolis finds magnet schools don't work to desegregate

StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 21:14
Minneapolis finds uneven academic performance and little effect on racial minorities’ isolation.

North Side safety summit examines ways to fight crime in troubled Minneapolis neighborhoods

StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 20:59
With warmer days coming, and typically more crime, public officials and faith leaders gathered to strategize.

Friends recall the rise and fall Victor Barnard

StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 20:02
From charismatic kid to wanted fugitive, friends recall how a kid from Minneapolis fell in with The Way and lost his way.

MayDay 2014 starting the Joy early

Alan Wilfahrt The MayDay Parade has a new start time this year. The partying puppets and associates will begin their entertaining of the parade viewers starting at Noon on May 4th, 2014, an hour earlier then previous years. The Ceremony will commence at its customary (aproximate) 3:30 p.m. time, allowing the Sun to get into position. Powderhorn Park will be vibrant with the MayDay Festival for all the daylight hours. Simply start your joy on MayDay an hour earlier.  A list of positions for those bent on polishing their stage presence.

C. [Canadian] Geese + Heron + Blessing of Space

Bees + Flowers - the Wonder of Organized Work

Monarchs - the Incredible Metamorphosis + the Connection of 2 Countries

1,000,000 Tiny Things - making soil + planting seeds

Soualar Dance - Sun Arrives

Raise the Tree of Life … TOGETHER

Sign Up

 

You are not required to Act. Much work is done by people apart from the Ceremony performance or Parading. Immediately people may lend a hand with a paint brush, or draping puppet paste soaked paper strips over forms, or add some color to Solar Lanterns using your SoularPowers.

  

MayDay Volunteer informationlist of the volunteer — positions that people like you fill — the HOBT.org website. True immersion works best by attending a free Public Workshop. Saturate your soul — celebrate early, and often.

 help feed MayDay

 

to feed your soul;

MayDay Free Public Workshops information


    Condoleezza Rice tells U crowd: 'We kept the nation safe'

    StarTribune Mpls News - Fri, 2014-04-18 02:50
    Her controversial appearance at the University of Minnesota drew some protesters, but she received a warm welcome inside Northrop.

    Heroin crackdown begins with raids, arrests

    StarTribune Mpls News - Thu, 2014-04-17 21:15
    The raids across the state marked a major policy change in going after Mexican drug cartels, authorities say.

    Announcing CiviCRM 4.4.5

    Civi Blog - Thu, 2014-04-17 20:06

    Here's another exciting release of CiviCRM, with maintenance and stability improvements to give you the best possible experience. Download CiviCRM 4.4.5 now.

    » View all issues fixed in the 4.4.5 release.

    What's New In CiviCRM 4.4

    » View the full list of improvements for 4.4

    New Extensions for 4.4

    Not all the good stuff in CiviCRM comes in the main package. There are also many extensions you can install. Here are some exciting new and updated extensions for CiviCRM 4.4.

    • CiviHR - A fully-featured Human-Resources management application for charities and non-profits.
    • CiviVolunteer - Recruit and manage a variety of volunteers for your events.
    • Webform Payments - The popular Webform Integration module now integrates with CiviContribute, CiviMember, and paid CiviEvents.
    • SEPA Direct Debit Payments - Allows CiviCRM users to setup an SDD compliant payment process for recurring and one-off direct debits.
    • CiviBooking - Now organisations can manage a group of resources (i.e. rooms, equipment, etc.) offering these to constituents for a fee.

    CiviCRM is free, open source software made possible through contributions from people like you. If your organization benefits from using CiviCRM and from the great new features in this release, please consider making a recurring contribution to support the project.

    Compatibility

    CiviCRM 4.4 is compatible with:

    • Drupal 7
    • Drupal 6 (community supported)
    • Joomla 2.5 & 3.0
    • Wordpress 3.4 and higher
    New Installations

    If you are installing CiviCRM 4.4 from scratch, please use the corresponding automated installer instructions:

    Upgrading to 4.4

    If your site is highly customized with special code or theming for CiviCRM you will want to upgrade a test copy first and test your customizations. For everyone else, follow these simple steps to get yourself up and running with 4.4.

    Contributors

    Community support and engagement is the force that sustains and drives CiviCRM forward. This release would not have been possible without the incredible contributions of these people and organizations:

    AGH Strategies - Andrew Hunt; Backoffice Thinking; Chris Burgess; Circle Interactive - Andrew Walker, Dave Moreton; CiviDesk - Nicolas Ganivet; CiviHosting - Hershel Robinson; Community Builders; Compucorp - Jamie Novick, Erawat Chamanont; Confluence - Frank Gomez, Michael Daryabeygi; Dave D; CiviCoop - Erik Hommel; Drupal Association - Neil Drumm; Electronic Frontier Foundation - Micah Lee, Kellie Brownell; Emphanos - Allen Shaw; Fuzion NZ - Eileen McNaughton, Peter Davis, Torrance Hodgeson; Giant Rabbit- Anna Heath; Jim Meehan; JMA Consulting - Joe Murray; Keith Morgan; Ken West; Korlon - Stuart Gaston; Koumbit - Samuel Vanhove; Lighthouse Consulting and Design - Brian Shaughnessy; Mathieu Lutfy; National Democratic Institute - Chris Doten; New York State Senate - Ken Zalewski; NfP Services (MTL Software Group) - Jag Kandasamy, Rajesh Sundararajan; Niro Solutions; Noah Miller; Orgis - Hans Idink; Palante Technology Cooperative - Jon Goldberg; Progressive Tech Project - Alice Aguilar, Jamie McClelland; Paul Delbar; Registered Nurses Association of Ontario; San Francisco Baykeeper - Eliet Henderson; Tadpole - Dana Skall; Tallyfox; Tech to the People - Xavier Dutoit; Third Sector Design; Veda Consulting - Parvez Saleh; Web Access - Pradeep Nayak; Wikimedia Foundation - Adam Wight; Zing - Simon West, Andrew Tombs, CiviDesk - Nicolas Ganivet.

    Meth lab house in south Minneapolis faces cleanup orders

    StarTribune Mpls News - Thu, 2014-04-17 17:44
    The home’s owner faces penalties, but can keep living there, the city says.

    Mpls. man with HIV pleads guilty to knowingly having unprotected sex

    StarTribune Mpls News - Thu, 2014-04-17 02:39
    The agreement in this rare prosecution brought to an end the legal saga of Daniel Rick, who will serve probation.

    Roseville cops sued over arrest involving use of force, Taser

    StarTribune Mpls News - Thu, 2014-04-17 02:18
    Roseville officers are seen in video throwing the man to the ground after a stop.

    Police see more heroin surfacing across Minneapolis

    StarTribune Mpls News - Wed, 2014-04-16 20:42
    The number of cases in the past two years is well above what police had been seeing over the past decade.

    Redlining: Twin Cities banks still restricting home loans in "non-white" areas

    Sheila Regan Bill Sorem The Uptake

    Members of Neighborhoods Organizing for Change (NOC), ISAIAH, and Minnesotans for a Fair Economy stood together outside Minneapolis City Hall to accuse banks of continuing to “red-line” communities of color and refusing to refinance sub-prime mortgages from 2009-2012. Accompanying the activists and researchers were three Minneapolis City Council members — Blong Yang, Elizabeth Glidden and Cam Gordon, all of whom called for something to be done.

    “What the report shows very clearly is that big banks like Wells Fargo are redlining communities of color,” said Anthony Newby, executive director of NOC. “The report shows that redlining is alive and well, and in some ways it’s worse than it’s ever been.”

    Myron Orfield from the University of Minnesota Law School’s Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which prepared the report, said the study shows that from 2009 to 2012, people in predominantly non-white Minneapolis neighborhoods such as Near North and Camden were three times more likely to be denied loans — regardless of what race the person was who applied for the loan.

    “Our report shows that the lack of access to credit continues to plague communities of color in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area,” Orfield said. “The income of the residents doesn’t explain what’s happening. If home loan portfolios of the region’s banks simply reflected the actual income and backgrounds of the people (who) lived in these neighborhoods, more than 13,000 additional loans would have been given to racially diverse and nonwhite neighborhoods in the Twin Cities over the course of the four years between 2009 and 2012. That would have been a 55 percent increase.”

    The report found that even middle- and high-income households in mostly non-white areas were much more likely to be denied loans than in other areas, with middle- and high-income people of color in nonwhite neighborhoods twice as likely to be denied loans than in predominantly white areas.

    Wells Fargo, the region’s largest lender, accounted for about a fourth of the lending shortfalls in the region’s racially diverse and predominantly nonwhite neighborhoods, according to the report.

    “I’m not a mathematician, but I’m mad,” Newby said. “Not only is it immoral and unjust, it’s illegal. We’re outside City Hall today because we believe the city has an obligation to take bold steps to correct this. We cannot and will not believe that banks will fix this on their own.”

    Ruby Brown, a NOC board member, also spoke at the press conference. Brown fought for two years against Bank of America for refusing to modify her mortgage. Finally, after a national campaign, she was able to get her home refinanced within a week. “I should not have to go to that extreme to get help,” she said. “To this day I’m fighting for a principal reduction. My house is still under water.”

    According to Brown, she became a victim of predatory lending when she was convinced by a member of her church to refinance with a mortgage company that no longer exists, and whose owner cannot be found.

    “There have been so many people that have been preyed upon, even within their churches,” she said. “With mortgage companies that have refinanced people with loans that they didn’t understand. I was preyed upon. I’ve been a deacon in my church for 10 years and even I fell victim to this crisis – it’s an epidemic. We are standing here based on knowing it’s an easily fixed situation. It’s just a matter of sitting down and re-doing paper work to get people in their homes.”

    Rev. Kelly Chatman, pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church in Minneapolis and member of ISAIAH’s clergy caucus, recalled how the phrase “One Minneapolis” was a frequent message of Mayor Betsy Hodges during her campaign. “We need to stand together and work with the city and the mayor and the solicitor to make sure we are together for One Minneapolis, where all of us have a place,” he said. “Martin Luther King talked about a beloved community. I’ve heard a lot said lately about One Minneapolis. One Minneapolis means everybody has a place, everybody has an opportunity, everybody has access to equity. Standing together. Let’s fight! Let’s make sure we have One Minneapolis and a beloved community for all of Minneapolis.”

    While Mayor Hodges wasn’t present at the Thursday (April 10) press conference, three city council members stood outside City Hall with the organizers. Cam Gordon expressed embarrassment that Minneapolis has had such disparities. “We talk about big banks wanting to be partners, we hear about the good work they are trying to do in the community,” he said. Gordon said that Minneapolis needs to rectify the situation. ”We need to say, knock it off,” he said.

    Glidden, too, said the report was important information. “We need to review it as such,” she said, expressing the need to not just look at the stats. “It’s about people,” she said.

    Blong Yang, meanwhile, who represents North Minneapolis in Ward 5, said, “we have to not just give lip service, but figure out what we can do to address it.”

    Members of Neighborhoods Organizing for Change (NOC), ISAIAH, and Minnesotans for a Fair Economy stood together outside Minneapolis City Hall to accuse banks of continuing to “red-line” communities of color and refusing to refinance sub-prime mortgages from 2009-2012. Accompanying the activists and researchers were three Minneapolis City Council members — Blong Yang, Elizabeth Glidden and Cam Gordon, all of whom called for something to be done.

    “What the report shows very clearly is that big banks like Wells Fargo are redlining communities of color,” said Anthony Newby, executive director of NOC. “The report shows that redlining is alive and well, and in some ways it’s worse than it’s ever been.”

    Myron Orfield from the University of Minnesota Law School’s Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which prepared the report, said the study shows that from 2009 to 2012, people in predominantly non-white Minneapolis neighborhoods such as Near North and Camden were three times more likely to be denied loans — regardless of what race the person was who applied for the loan.

    “Our report shows that the lack of access to credit continues to plague communities of color in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area,” Orfield said. “The income of the residents doesn’t explain what’s happening. If home loan portfolios of the region’s banks simply reflected the actual income and backgrounds of the people (who) lived in these neighborhoods, more than 13,000 additional loans would have been given to racially diverse and nonwhite neighborhoods in the Twin Cities over the course of the four years between 2009 and 2012. That would have been a 55 percent increase.”

    The report found that even middle- and high-income households in mostly non-white areas were much more likely to be denied loans than in other areas, with middle- and high-income people of color in nonwhite neighborhoods twice as likely to be denied loans than in predominantly white areas.

    Wells Fargo, the region’s largest lender, accounted for about a fourth of the lending shortfalls in the region’s racially diverse and predominantly nonwhite neighborhoods, according to the report.

    “I’m not a mathematician, but I’m mad,” Newby said. “Not only is it immoral and unjust, it’s illegal. We’re outside City Hall today because we believe the city has an obligation to take bold steps to correct this. We cannot and will not believe that banks will fix this on their own.”

    Ruby Brown, a NOC board member, also spoke at the press conference. Brown fought for two years against Bank of America for refusing to modify her mortgage. Finally, after a national campaign, she was able to get her home refinanced within a week. “I should not have to go to that extreme to get help,” she said. “To this day I’m fighting for a principal reduction. My house is still under water.”

    According to Brown, she became a victim of predatory lending when she was convinced by a member of her church to refinance with a mortgage company that no longer exists, and whose owner cannot be found.

    “There have been so many people that have been preyed upon, even within their churches,” she said. “With mortgage companies that have refinanced people with loans that they didn’t understand. I was preyed upon. I’ve been a deacon in my church for 10 years and even I fell victim to this crisis – it’s an epidemic. We are standing here based on knowing it’s an easily fixed situation. It’s just a matter of sitting down and re-doing paper work to get people in their homes.”

    Rev. Kelly Chatman, pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church in Minneapolis and member of ISAIAH’s clergy caucus, recalled how the phrase “One Minneapolis” was a frequent message of Mayor Betsy Hodges during her campaign. “We need to stand together and work with the city and the mayor and the solicitor to make sure we are together for One Minneapolis, where all of us have a place,” he said. “Martin Luther King talked about a beloved community. I’ve heard a lot said lately about One Minneapolis. One Minneapolis means everybody has a place, everybody has an opportunity, everybody has access to equity. Standing together. Let’s fight! Let’s make sure we have One Minneapolis and a beloved community for all of Minneapolis.”

    While Mayor Hodges wasn’t present at the Thursday (April 10) press conference, three city council members stood outside City Hall with the organizers. Cam Gordon expressed embarrassment that Minneapolis has had such disparities. “We talk about big banks wanting to be partners, we hear about the good work they are trying to do in the community,” he said. Gordon said that Minneapolis needs to rectify the situation. ”We need to say, knock it off,” he said.

    Glidden, too, said the report was important information. “We need to review it as such,” she said, expressing the need to not just look at the stats. “It’s about people,” she said.

    Blong Yang, meanwhile, who represents North Minneapolis in Ward 5, said, “we have to not just give lip service, but figure out what we can do to address it.”

    © 2014 The Uptake

      Redlining: Twin Cities banks still restricting home loans in "non-white" areas

      Sheila Regan Bill Sorem The Uptake

      Members of Neighborhoods Organizing for Change (NOC), ISAIAH, and Minnesotans for a Fair Economy stood together outside Minneapolis City Hall to accuse banks of continuing to “red-line” communities of color and refusing to refinance sub-prime mortgages from 2009-2012. Accompanying the activists and researchers were three Minneapolis City Council members — Blong Yang, Elizabeth Glidden and Cam Gordon, all of whom called for something to be done.

      “What the report shows very clearly is that big banks like Wells Fargo are redlining communities of color,” said Anthony Newby, executive director of NOC. “The report shows that redlining is alive and well, and in some ways it’s worse than it’s ever been.”

      Myron Orfield from the University of Minnesota Law School’s Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which prepared the report, said the study shows that from 2009 to 2012, people in predominantly non-white Minneapolis neighborhoods such as Near North and Camden were three times more likely to be denied loans — regardless of what race the person was who applied for the loan.

      “Our report shows that the lack of access to credit continues to plague communities of color in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area,” Orfield said. “The income of the residents doesn’t explain what’s happening. If home loan portfolios of the region’s banks simply reflected the actual income and backgrounds of the people (who) lived in these neighborhoods, more than 13,000 additional loans would have been given to racially diverse and nonwhite neighborhoods in the Twin Cities over the course of the four years between 2009 and 2012. That would have been a 55 percent increase.”

      The report found that even middle- and high-income households in mostly non-white areas were much more likely to be denied loans than in other areas, with middle- and high-income people of color in nonwhite neighborhoods twice as likely to be denied loans than in predominantly white areas.

      Wells Fargo, the region’s largest lender, accounted for about a fourth of the lending shortfalls in the region’s racially diverse and predominantly nonwhite neighborhoods, according to the report.

      “I’m not a mathematician, but I’m mad,” Newby said. “Not only is it immoral and unjust, it’s illegal. We’re outside City Hall today because we believe the city has an obligation to take bold steps to correct this. We cannot and will not believe that banks will fix this on their own.”

      Ruby Brown, a NOC board member, also spoke at the press conference. Brown fought for two years against Bank of America for refusing to modify her mortgage. Finally, after a national campaign, she was able to get her home refinanced within a week. “I should not have to go to that extreme to get help,” she said. “To this day I’m fighting for a principal reduction. My house is still under water.”

      According to Brown, she became a victim of predatory lending when she was convinced by a member of her church to refinance with a mortgage company that no longer exists, and whose owner cannot be found.

      “There have been so many people that have been preyed upon, even within their churches,” she said. “With mortgage companies that have refinanced people with loans that they didn’t understand. I was preyed upon. I’ve been a deacon in my church for 10 years and even I fell victim to this crisis – it’s an epidemic. We are standing here based on knowing it’s an easily fixed situation. It’s just a matter of sitting down and re-doing paper work to get people in their homes.”

      Rev. Kelly Chatman, pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church in Minneapolis and member of ISAIAH’s clergy caucus, recalled how the phrase “One Minneapolis” was a frequent message of Mayor Betsy Hodges during her campaign. “We need to stand together and work with the city and the mayor and the solicitor to make sure we are together for One Minneapolis, where all of us have a place,” he said. “Martin Luther King talked about a beloved community. I’ve heard a lot said lately about One Minneapolis. One Minneapolis means everybody has a place, everybody has an opportunity, everybody has access to equity. Standing together. Let’s fight! Let’s make sure we have One Minneapolis and a beloved community for all of Minneapolis.”

      While Mayor Hodges wasn’t present at the Thursday (April 10) press conference, three city council members stood outside City Hall with the organizers. Cam Gordon expressed embarrassment that Minneapolis has had such disparities. “We talk about big banks wanting to be partners, we hear about the good work they are trying to do in the community,” he said. Gordon said that Minneapolis needs to rectify the situation. ”We need to say, knock it off,” he said.

      Glidden, too, said the report was important information. “We need to review it as such,” she said, expressing the need to not just look at the stats. “It’s about people,” she said.

      Blong Yang, meanwhile, who represents North Minneapolis in Ward 5, said, “we have to not just give lip service, but figure out what we can do to address it.”

      Members of Neighborhoods Organizing for Change (NOC), ISAIAH, and Minnesotans for a Fair Economy stood together outside Minneapolis City Hall to accuse banks of continuing to “red-line” communities of color and refusing to refinance sub-prime mortgages from 2009-2012. Accompanying the activists and researchers were three Minneapolis City Council members — Blong Yang, Elizabeth Glidden and Cam Gordon, all of whom called for something to be done.

      “What the report shows very clearly is that big banks like Wells Fargo are redlining communities of color,” said Anthony Newby, executive director of NOC. “The report shows that redlining is alive and well, and in some ways it’s worse than it’s ever been.”

      Myron Orfield from the University of Minnesota Law School’s Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which prepared the report, said the study shows that from 2009 to 2012, people in predominantly non-white Minneapolis neighborhoods such as Near North and Camden were three times more likely to be denied loans — regardless of what race the person was who applied for the loan.

      “Our report shows that the lack of access to credit continues to plague communities of color in the Twin Cities Metropolitan area,” Orfield said. “The income of the residents doesn’t explain what’s happening. If home loan portfolios of the region’s banks simply reflected the actual income and backgrounds of the people (who) lived in these neighborhoods, more than 13,000 additional loans would have been given to racially diverse and nonwhite neighborhoods in the Twin Cities over the course of the four years between 2009 and 2012. That would have been a 55 percent increase.”

      The report found that even middle- and high-income households in mostly non-white areas were much more likely to be denied loans than in other areas, with middle- and high-income people of color in nonwhite neighborhoods twice as likely to be denied loans than in predominantly white areas.

      Wells Fargo, the region’s largest lender, accounted for about a fourth of the lending shortfalls in the region’s racially diverse and predominantly nonwhite neighborhoods, according to the report.

      “I’m not a mathematician, but I’m mad,” Newby said. “Not only is it immoral and unjust, it’s illegal. We’re outside City Hall today because we believe the city has an obligation to take bold steps to correct this. We cannot and will not believe that banks will fix this on their own.”

      Ruby Brown, a NOC board member, also spoke at the press conference. Brown fought for two years against Bank of America for refusing to modify her mortgage. Finally, after a national campaign, she was able to get her home refinanced within a week. “I should not have to go to that extreme to get help,” she said. “To this day I’m fighting for a principal reduction. My house is still under water.”

      According to Brown, she became a victim of predatory lending when she was convinced by a member of her church to refinance with a mortgage company that no longer exists, and whose owner cannot be found.

      “There have been so many people that have been preyed upon, even within their churches,” she said. “With mortgage companies that have refinanced people with loans that they didn’t understand. I was preyed upon. I’ve been a deacon in my church for 10 years and even I fell victim to this crisis – it’s an epidemic. We are standing here based on knowing it’s an easily fixed situation. It’s just a matter of sitting down and re-doing paper work to get people in their homes.”

      Rev. Kelly Chatman, pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church in Minneapolis and member of ISAIAH’s clergy caucus, recalled how the phrase “One Minneapolis” was a frequent message of Mayor Betsy Hodges during her campaign. “We need to stand together and work with the city and the mayor and the solicitor to make sure we are together for One Minneapolis, where all of us have a place,” he said. “Martin Luther King talked about a beloved community. I’ve heard a lot said lately about One Minneapolis. One Minneapolis means everybody has a place, everybody has an opportunity, everybody has access to equity. Standing together. Let’s fight! Let’s make sure we have One Minneapolis and a beloved community for all of Minneapolis.”

      While Mayor Hodges wasn’t present at the Thursday (April 10) press conference, three city council members stood outside City Hall with the organizers. Cam Gordon expressed embarrassment that Minneapolis has had such disparities. “We talk about big banks wanting to be partners, we hear about the good work they are trying to do in the community,” he said. Gordon said that Minneapolis needs to rectify the situation. ”We need to say, knock it off,” he said.

      Glidden, too, said the report was important information. “We need to review it as such,” she said, expressing the need to not just look at the stats. “It’s about people,” she said.

      Blong Yang, meanwhile, who represents North Minneapolis in Ward 5, said, “we have to not just give lip service, but figure out what we can do to address it.”

      © 2014 The Uptake

        Marcy-Holmes finalizing master plan, seeking feedback

        The Minnesota Daily

        The Marcy-Holmes master plan update, which will guide growth and development in the neighborhood, was released Wednesday for public comment.

        The 2014 update to the master plan incorporates the in-progress Dinkytown small area plan. Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association members discussed at a meeting Tuesday night how the plan can manage the current neighborhood’s divide on how to develop the area.

        Master Plan steering committee leader Bob Stableski said the neighborhood’s character spots — from the riverfront to industry and residential areas — are each facing different problems.

        “This isn’t a homogeneous neighborhood,” he said. “The value of the plan is that we can look at these things on a neighborhood-wide basis and also break them down into the five different character areas.”

        The neighborhood has come up with six themes that come into play throughout the plan: “Be one neighborhood,” “live here now,” “make the streets ours,” “make change contribute,” “love the riverfront” and “welcome the tension of complexity and contradiction.”

        Proposed projects include improving riverfront connections, encouraging investment along Fifth Street Southeast to create more livable streets, increasing the frequency of transit on University Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast, and expanding the Dinkytown commercial area while preserving its historic qualities.

        The update also proposes improving areas between campus and the Stone Arch Bridge. MHNA President Cordelia Pierson said the neighborhood is looking forward to partnering with the University to do that.

        “[The idea has] been on the books for about 20 years,” she said. “It’s just needed some focus and prioritizing, so we’re hoping to bring that to life.”

        The city approved the neighborhood’s first master plan in 2003, which came from hearing what residents liked or disliked about the neighborhood, what aspects they wanted to preserve, what goals they wanted to achieve and what they wanted to avoid. Since then, the neighborhood has amended the plan several times, but it will fully update the plan every decade.

        Pierson said she was “very happy” about the public input the MHNA has received during the planning process and is proud of the diversity of participants.

        “Many of the people who participated and provided input on the Dinkytown planning part had not traditionally been involved in neighborhood and land-use planning,” she said. “We think we did a good job reaching people and hearing from people who aren’t the traditional show-up-at-evening-meetings people.”

        The MHNA has also received student input from its Minnesota Student Association board representative Clay Wagar, who said he appreciated the level of student feedback sought.

        “Cordelia did make a lot of effort to engage students,” he said. “My concerns were listened to and met enthusiastically by the rest of the board.”

        Minneapolis city planner Haila Maze, who has been working on the project, said the next step for the plan is publishing the update on the city’s website and beginning the 45-day review period during which the city welcomes public comments. The City Council will then approve it, likely by the summer.

        Maze said the city will respond comment by comment and encourages public feedback.

        “People care a lot about the Dinkytown, Marcy-Holmes area,” she said. “We need to support the area so it’s sustainable and livable.”

        Related stories:

        The Marcy-Holmes master plan update, which will guide growth and development in the neighborhood, was released Wednesday for public comment.

        The 2014 update to the master plan incorporates the in-progress Dinkytown small area plan. Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association members discussed at a meeting Tuesday night how the plan can manage the current neighborhood’s divide on how to develop the area.

        Master Plan steering committee leader Bob Stableski said the neighborhood’s character spots — from the riverfront to industry and residential areas — are each facing different problems.

        “This isn’t a homogeneous neighborhood,” he said. “The value of the plan is that we can look at these things on a neighborhood-wide basis and also break them down into the five different character areas.”

        The neighborhood has come up with six themes that come into play throughout the plan: “Be one neighborhood,” “live here now,” “make the streets ours,” “make change contribute,” “love the riverfront” and “welcome the tension of complexity and contradiction.”

        Proposed projects include improving riverfront connections, encouraging investment along Fifth Street Southeast to create more livable streets, increasing the frequency of transit on University Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast, and expanding the Dinkytown commercial area while preserving its historic qualities.

        The update also proposes improving areas between campus and the Stone Arch Bridge. MHNA President Cordelia Pierson said the neighborhood is looking forward to partnering with the University to do that.

        “[The idea has] been on the books for about 20 years,” she said. “It’s just needed some focus and prioritizing, so we’re hoping to bring that to life.”

        The city approved the neighborhood’s first master plan in 2003, which came from hearing what residents liked or disliked about the neighborhood, what aspects they wanted to preserve, what goals they wanted to achieve and what they wanted to avoid. Since then, the neighborhood has amended the plan several times, but it will fully update the plan every decade.

        Pierson said she was “very happy” about the public input the MHNA has received during the planning process and is proud of the diversity of participants.

        “Many of the people who participated and provided input on the Dinkytown planning part had not traditionally been involved in neighborhood and land-use planning,” she said. “We think we did a good job reaching people and hearing from people who aren’t the traditional show-up-at-evening-meetings people.”

        The MHNA has also received student input from its Minnesota Student Association board representative Clay Wagar, who said he appreciated the level of student feedback sought.

        “Cordelia did make a lot of effort to engage students,” he said. “My concerns were listened to and met enthusiastically by the rest of the board.”

        Minneapolis city planner Haila Maze, who has been working on the project, said the next step for the plan is publishing the update on the city’s website and beginning the 45-day review period during which the city welcomes public comments. The City Council will then approve it, likely by the summer.

        Maze said the city will respond comment by comment and encourages public feedback.

        “People care a lot about the Dinkytown, Marcy-Holmes area,” she said. “We need to support the area so it’s sustainable and livable.”

        Related stories:

        © 2014 The Minnesota Daily

          Marcy-Holmes finalizing master plan, seeking feedback

          The Minnesota Daily

          The Marcy-Holmes master plan update, which will guide growth and development in the neighborhood, was released Wednesday for public comment.

          The 2014 update to the master plan incorporates the in-progress Dinkytown small area plan. Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association members discussed at a meeting Tuesday night how the plan can manage the current neighborhood’s divide on how to develop the area.

          Master Plan steering committee leader Bob Stableski said the neighborhood’s character spots — from the riverfront to industry and residential areas — are each facing different problems.

          “This isn’t a homogeneous neighborhood,” he said. “The value of the plan is that we can look at these things on a neighborhood-wide basis and also break them down into the five different character areas.”

          The neighborhood has come up with six themes that come into play throughout the plan: “Be one neighborhood,” “live here now,” “make the streets ours,” “make change contribute,” “love the riverfront” and “welcome the tension of complexity and contradiction.”

          Proposed projects include improving riverfront connections, encouraging investment along Fifth Street Southeast to create more livable streets, increasing the frequency of transit on University Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast, and expanding the Dinkytown commercial area while preserving its historic qualities.

          The update also proposes improving areas between campus and the Stone Arch Bridge. MHNA President Cordelia Pierson said the neighborhood is looking forward to partnering with the University to do that.

          “[The idea has] been on the books for about 20 years,” she said. “It’s just needed some focus and prioritizing, so we’re hoping to bring that to life.”

          The city approved the neighborhood’s first master plan in 2003, which came from hearing what residents liked or disliked about the neighborhood, what aspects they wanted to preserve, what goals they wanted to achieve and what they wanted to avoid. Since then, the neighborhood has amended the plan several times, but it will fully update the plan every decade.

          Pierson said she was “very happy” about the public input the MHNA has received during the planning process and is proud of the diversity of participants.

          “Many of the people who participated and provided input on the Dinkytown planning part had not traditionally been involved in neighborhood and land-use planning,” she said. “We think we did a good job reaching people and hearing from people who aren’t the traditional show-up-at-evening-meetings people.”

          The MHNA has also received student input from its Minnesota Student Association board representative Clay Wagar, who said he appreciated the level of student feedback sought.

          “Cordelia did make a lot of effort to engage students,” he said. “My concerns were listened to and met enthusiastically by the rest of the board.”

          Minneapolis city planner Haila Maze, who has been working on the project, said the next step for the plan is publishing the update on the city’s website and beginning the 45-day review period during which the city welcomes public comments. The City Council will then approve it, likely by the summer.

          Maze said the city will respond comment by comment and encourages public feedback.

          “People care a lot about the Dinkytown, Marcy-Holmes area,” she said. “We need to support the area so it’s sustainable and livable.”

          Related stories:

          The Marcy-Holmes master plan update, which will guide growth and development in the neighborhood, was released Wednesday for public comment.

          The 2014 update to the master plan incorporates the in-progress Dinkytown small area plan. Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association members discussed at a meeting Tuesday night how the plan can manage the current neighborhood’s divide on how to develop the area.

          Master Plan steering committee leader Bob Stableski said the neighborhood’s character spots — from the riverfront to industry and residential areas — are each facing different problems.

          “This isn’t a homogeneous neighborhood,” he said. “The value of the plan is that we can look at these things on a neighborhood-wide basis and also break them down into the five different character areas.”

          The neighborhood has come up with six themes that come into play throughout the plan: “Be one neighborhood,” “live here now,” “make the streets ours,” “make change contribute,” “love the riverfront” and “welcome the tension of complexity and contradiction.”

          Proposed projects include improving riverfront connections, encouraging investment along Fifth Street Southeast to create more livable streets, increasing the frequency of transit on University Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street Southeast, and expanding the Dinkytown commercial area while preserving its historic qualities.

          The update also proposes improving areas between campus and the Stone Arch Bridge. MHNA President Cordelia Pierson said the neighborhood is looking forward to partnering with the University to do that.

          “[The idea has] been on the books for about 20 years,” she said. “It’s just needed some focus and prioritizing, so we’re hoping to bring that to life.”

          The city approved the neighborhood’s first master plan in 2003, which came from hearing what residents liked or disliked about the neighborhood, what aspects they wanted to preserve, what goals they wanted to achieve and what they wanted to avoid. Since then, the neighborhood has amended the plan several times, but it will fully update the plan every decade.

          Pierson said she was “very happy” about the public input the MHNA has received during the planning process and is proud of the diversity of participants.

          “Many of the people who participated and provided input on the Dinkytown planning part had not traditionally been involved in neighborhood and land-use planning,” she said. “We think we did a good job reaching people and hearing from people who aren’t the traditional show-up-at-evening-meetings people.”

          The MHNA has also received student input from its Minnesota Student Association board representative Clay Wagar, who said he appreciated the level of student feedback sought.

          “Cordelia did make a lot of effort to engage students,” he said. “My concerns were listened to and met enthusiastically by the rest of the board.”

          Minneapolis city planner Haila Maze, who has been working on the project, said the next step for the plan is publishing the update on the city’s website and beginning the 45-day review period during which the city welcomes public comments. The City Council will then approve it, likely by the summer.

          Maze said the city will respond comment by comment and encourages public feedback.

          “People care a lot about the Dinkytown, Marcy-Holmes area,” she said. “We need to support the area so it’s sustainable and livable.”

          Related stories:

          © 2014 The Minnesota Daily

            Pages

            Subscribe to Lyndale Neighborhood Association aggregator