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Northeast will have a tool library

Tue, 2014-10-28 15:07
Margo Ashmore Northeaster

If you’ve ever found that a home fix-it job was twice or three times as expensive as predicted because you decided to buy tools you may never use again, you’ll appreciate the Northeast Minneapolis Tool Library.

Lawn mowers, snowblowers, sheetrock lifts, plumbing and tiling tools, car ramps and maybe even a commercial sewing machine are just a few of potentially thousands of tools that could be available. The six board members behind this effort are so serious about making it happen, they’ve agreed to lease a 700-square foot space in the Thorp Building and plan to open in spring.

A $35,000 grant from Windom Park Citizens in Action seeds the non-profit venture, and to sustain it, those who use it will pay an annual membership (about $60) to defray maintenance, rent, and other costs. Members will be able to check out tools for use for perhaps a few days or a week at a time. Grants will be sought to buy more tools and offer education. There will be paid staff.

At the second public meeting on the subject, reasons for getting involved illuminated the benefits of tool lending. It’s consistent with shared economy, same as bike sharing or car sharing or airbnb, the online tool for finding unique local places to stay. As Tom Durfee, one of the board members, said, “I’m an economist, and we say that which is not being used, is a waste.”

Others see it as a way to keep property values up by encouraging new homeowners to learn maintenance methods and make it easy for people who don’t have the money to hire things done, to learn to do it themselves.

Some of the about two dozen people who attended had experience with, for example, the Grease Rag women’s bicycle maintenance cooperative, or shared “maker” spaces where people use expensive machinery on-site. That is a possibility at the new tool library.

It should be pointed out, while the group happened to meet at the Northeast Library, the word “library” simply refers to the idea of checking out tools for a period of time, there’s no actual connection to the book-lending system.

Some people attended the meeting to offer expertise. Pat Kartes said he and his wife renovated their entire home, a former tavern, and he’s been a tool and die machinist. “I still have all my fingers.”

Katheryn Schneider posed the question whether members might be able to join by donating their own excess tools.

Tool lending libraries are not new. They’ve been found for decades in communities where many homes need fixing and resources are stretched. A group in West Seattle has developed software to allow participants to check availability, with instant bar-code checkout and soon possibly a phone app. The Northeast group has many models to follow.

As the discussion broke into small groups, one of the most popular was Tool Acquisition, thinking of categories and specific tools to carry. Some were nixed, for example anything gasoline-powered, and others were starred that would need special training to avoid injury. Users will sign liability waivers, of course.

They wanted ideas on service area, limited for now to Northeast but perhaps charging more for memberships from people in nearby areas eventually. They asked whether people would care about grant sources; would there be any entities that there would be a philosophical reason not to approach. At one table they were listing potential partners, individuals or groups to reach out to for publicity, events to attend.

Participants were encouraged to compile lists of resources such as maker spaces, art co-ops, bike co-ops and other places to find highly-specialized categories of tools, classes, etc. to which people can be referred if the tool library doesn’t carry or doesn’t have enough of those tools.

The tool library will likely have free or low cost bins full of gloves and other expendables. One suggestion was to collect and offer leftover caulk, tile spacers, pipe wrapping tape and similar supplies for people to take, use a bit, and then return.

To contact the Northeast Minneapolis Tool Library, call 971-222-9118, Thomas Ebert, Tool Librarian, or email: northeast [dot] mpls [dot] tool [dot] library [at] gmail [dot] com. Website is not set up yet but will be www.nemtl.org, Facebook page is NortheastMinneapolisToolLibrary.

If you’ve ever found that a home fix-it job was twice or three times as expensive as predicted because you decided to buy tools you may never use again, you’ll appreciate the Northeast Minneapolis Tool Library.

Lawn mowers, snowblowers, sheetrock lifts, plumbing and tiling tools, car ramps and maybe even a commercial sewing machine are just a few of potentially thousands of tools that could be available. The six board members behind this effort are so serious about making it happen, they’ve agreed to lease a 700-square foot space in the Thorp Building and plan to open in spring.

A $35,000 grant from Windom Park Citizens in Action seeds the non-profit venture, and to sustain it, those who use it will pay an annual membership (about $60) to defray maintenance, rent, and other costs. Members will be able to check out tools for use for perhaps a few days or a week at a time. Grants will be sought to buy more tools and offer education. There will be paid staff.

At the second public meeting on the subject, reasons for getting involved illuminated the benefits of tool lending. It’s consistent with shared economy, same as bike sharing or car sharing or airbnb, the online tool for finding unique local places to stay. As Tom Durfee, one of the board members, said, “I’m an economist, and we say that which is not being used, is a waste.”

Others see it as a way to keep property values up by encouraging new homeowners to learn maintenance methods and make it easy for people who don’t have the money to hire things done, to learn to do it themselves.

Some of the about two dozen people who attended had experience with, for example, the Grease Rag women’s bicycle maintenance cooperative, or shared “maker” spaces where people use expensive machinery on-site. That is a possibility at the new tool library.

It should be pointed out, while the group happened to meet at the Northeast Library, the word “library” simply refers to the idea of checking out tools for a period of time, there’s no actual connection to the book-lending system.

Some people attended the meeting to offer expertise. Pat Kartes said he and his wife renovated their entire home, a former tavern, and he’s been a tool and die machinist. “I still have all my fingers.”

Katheryn Schneider posed the question whether members might be able to join by donating their own excess tools.

Tool lending libraries are not new. They’ve been found for decades in communities where many homes need fixing and resources are stretched. A group in West Seattle has developed software to allow participants to check availability, with instant bar-code checkout and soon possibly a phone app. The Northeast group has many models to follow.

As the discussion broke into small groups, one of the most popular was Tool Acquisition, thinking of categories and specific tools to carry. Some were nixed, for example anything gasoline-powered, and others were starred that would need special training to avoid injury. Users will sign liability waivers, of course.

They wanted ideas on service area, limited for now to Northeast but perhaps charging more for memberships from people in nearby areas eventually. They asked whether people would care about grant sources; would there be any entities that there would be a philosophical reason not to approach. At one table they were listing potential partners, individuals or groups to reach out to for publicity, events to attend.

Participants were encouraged to compile lists of resources such as maker spaces, art co-ops, bike co-ops and other places to find highly-specialized categories of tools, classes, etc. to which people can be referred if the tool library doesn’t carry or doesn’t have enough of those tools.

The tool library will likely have free or low cost bins full of gloves and other expendables. One suggestion was to collect and offer leftover caulk, tile spacers, pipe wrapping tape and similar supplies for people to take, use a bit, and then return.

To contact the Northeast Minneapolis Tool Library, call 971-222-9118, Thomas Ebert, Tool Librarian, or email: northeast [dot] mpls [dot] tool [dot] library [at] gmail [dot] com. Website is not set up yet but will be www.nemtl.org, Facebook page is NortheastMinneapolisToolLibrary.

© 2014 Northeaster

Cedar-Riverside residents voice concern with area homelessness

Tue, 2014-10-28 14:52
The Minnesota Daily

At a Cedar-Riverside neighborhood meeting earlier this month, a Somali elder stood and addressed attendees, painting an image of a recent frightening encounter with what he believed was a gang of drunken, homeless individuals.

“[The man] got out his hat that he had been wearing that day. It looked like egg or something splattered on it,” said Debbie Wolking, the housing development program manager for West Bank Community Development Corporation, which provides affordable housing in the neighborhood.

At the meeting, the man, who was speaking in Somali while a community leader translated to English, described the confrontation in which he said a group of people accosted him on the stretch of 20th Avenue South that overhangs Interstate 94.

Community leaders say homelessness has been an issue in the neighborhood for years, and they — along with the Minneapolis Police Department and St. Stephen’s Street Outreach team — are searching for remedies. But some say they’re struggling to find solutions.

At the Oct. 7 neighborhood meeting, which was designated to address safety, another man recounted an incident in which he felt pressure when a group of individuals approached him asking for cigarettes.

The impromptu stories shared by the two men highlight a neighborhood issue — albeit not a new one, said Phillip Kelly, the interim executive director for the West Bank Community Coalition.

“It’s a constant [issue],” he said. “There are always homeless folk hanging out by the [I-94] bridge.”

For Cedar-Riverside, it’s a larger problem than many people may think, said Monica Nilsson, community engagement director for St. Stephen’s Human Services, a group that opens homeless shelters and provides other housing services in Minneapolis.

She said the concentration of poverty in the neighborhood is comparable to that of downtown.

Many residents harbor concern about the local homeless population, citing incidents of panhandling or drunken behavior, particularly regarding activity near the I-94 overpass, said Russom Solomon, the chair of the West Bank Community Coalition’s Safety Committee.

“The area surrounding [and] behind it has been a problem for us,” Solomon said. “… And we’ve always been trying to deal with it.”

Wolking said it appears the same group of homeless people gathers in a handful of hotspots in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood.

“They’re doing things that make [residents] worried about having kids nearby,” she said. “All the things people would do in the privacy of their home, they’re done out on the street.”

Wolking said some of her renters have brought their concerns to her.

“There is one woman who has had an issue with people who are defecating in her yard,” she said, adding that another resident told her she witnessed two men assault a woman, all of whom appeared homeless, right outside her home.

Despite community members’ apprehensions, leaders say they’re unsure how to handle the situation.

Nilsson said St. Stephen’s Street Outreach Program is leading an effort to work with members of the community who are homeless and unsheltered.

“Our team goes out to, first of all, figure out what their immediate needs are,” she said, “and then [we] work towards what their long-term needs might be.”

Nilsson said the problem is delicate and sometimes difficult to handle. She said her group doesn’t encourage people to give food or change to people who are standing on the corner, but ignoring presumably homeless people isn’t the answer either.

Nilsson said the neighborhood’s homeless situation is the product of larger societal issues in which high rent and a lack of social services make affordable housing difficult to find. She said that in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood, the issue is as problematic for the homeless as it is for community members.

“It’s difficult to put [it in] numbers,” Solomon said. “But one elder accosted is one too many.”

At a Cedar-Riverside neighborhood meeting earlier this month, a Somali elder stood and addressed attendees, painting an image of a recent frightening encounter with what he believed was a gang of drunken, homeless individuals.

“[The man] got out his hat that he had been wearing that day. It looked like egg or something splattered on it,” said Debbie Wolking, the housing development program manager for West Bank Community Development Corporation, which provides affordable housing in the neighborhood.

At the meeting, the man, who was speaking in Somali while a community leader translated to English, described the confrontation in which he said a group of people accosted him on the stretch of 20th Avenue South that overhangs Interstate 94.

Community leaders say homelessness has been an issue in the neighborhood for years, and they — along with the Minneapolis Police Department and St. Stephen’s Street Outreach team — are searching for remedies. But some say they’re struggling to find solutions.

At the Oct. 7 neighborhood meeting, which was designated to address safety, another man recounted an incident in which he felt pressure when a group of individuals approached him asking for cigarettes.

The impromptu stories shared by the two men highlight a neighborhood issue — albeit not a new one, said Phillip Kelly, the interim executive director for the West Bank Community Coalition.

“It’s a constant [issue],” he said. “There are always homeless folk hanging out by the [I-94] bridge.”

For Cedar-Riverside, it’s a larger problem than many people may think, said Monica Nilsson, community engagement director for St. Stephen’s Human Services, a group that opens homeless shelters and provides other housing services in Minneapolis.

She said the concentration of poverty in the neighborhood is comparable to that of downtown.

Many residents harbor concern about the local homeless population, citing incidents of panhandling or drunken behavior, particularly regarding activity near the I-94 overpass, said Russom Solomon, the chair of the West Bank Community Coalition’s Safety Committee.

“The area surrounding [and] behind it has been a problem for us,” Solomon said. “… And we’ve always been trying to deal with it.”

Wolking said it appears the same group of homeless people gathers in a handful of hotspots in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood.

“They’re doing things that make [residents] worried about having kids nearby,” she said. “All the things people would do in the privacy of their home, they’re done out on the street.”

Wolking said some of her renters have brought their concerns to her.

“There is one woman who has had an issue with people who are defecating in her yard,” she said, adding that another resident told her she witnessed two men assault a woman, all of whom appeared homeless, right outside her home.

Despite community members’ apprehensions, leaders say they’re unsure how to handle the situation.

Nilsson said St. Stephen’s Street Outreach Program is leading an effort to work with members of the community who are homeless and unsheltered.

“Our team goes out to, first of all, figure out what their immediate needs are,” she said, “and then [we] work towards what their long-term needs might be.”

Nilsson said the problem is delicate and sometimes difficult to handle. She said her group doesn’t encourage people to give food or change to people who are standing on the corner, but ignoring presumably homeless people isn’t the answer either.

Nilsson said the neighborhood’s homeless situation is the product of larger societal issues in which high rent and a lack of social services make affordable housing difficult to find. She said that in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood, the issue is as problematic for the homeless as it is for community members.

“It’s difficult to put [it in] numbers,” Solomon said. “But one elder accosted is one too many.”

© 2014 The Minnesota Daily

Taller comunitario: Fundamentos de eficiencia energética

Fri, 2014-10-24 12:04
RossJoy Corcoran News

Listo para un invierno cómodo con ahorro de energía: miércoles 15 de octubre de 6 a 8pm en el gimnasio de Corcoran Park

¿Estás buscando maneras de ahorrar energía y reducir las tarifas mensuales de utilidades? Ambos, dueños de casa e inquilinos te invitan a que atiendas a un taller de los fundamentos de eficiencia energética, el miércoles 15 de octubre.

CNO se enorgullece de la alianza con Our Power, una coalición del sur de Minneapolis enfocada en soluciones comunitarias y uso de energía sostenible, para auspiciar este evento de vecinos. Habrá una discusión sobre cómo ocurre comúnmente la pérdida de energía y de calefacción, maneras costeables de agrandar la insolación y más hábitos que debes saber para reducir costos de energía.

Los vecinos de Corcoran Marlena Needham y Timothy DenHerder-Thomas, líderes con la coalición Our Power, estarán moderando el taller con el experto en eficiencia del hogar, Jim Walsh.

Después de aprender los fundamentos de eficiencia energética del hogar, los presentes serán invitados a aportar su conocimiento en sus vecindarios, registrándose para celebrar una fiesta en sus casas o una fiesta de la cuadra. La coalición Our Power está ofreciendo proveer entrenadores, materiales, herramientas y ayudar a realizar varias fiestas como talleres de eficiencia en el corredor de la calle Lake.

Fecha: Miércoles 15 de octubre

Hora: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Ubicación: Gimnasio de Parque Corcoran, 3334 20th Ave S

Esto evento de la Organización Vecindario de Corcoran (CNO) es parte de los eventos o talleres mensuales de nuestro comunidad.Todos los residentes del vecindario de Corcoran se invita a todos a asistir y son considerados miembros del CNO, después de compartir su información de contacto en una hoja de registración.

Para más información sobre el evento del 15 de octubre, favor de contactar a Ross Joy al 612-724-7457 o <ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org>. Para organizar su propio taller de eficiencia energética, contacta a Marlena Needham al 612-548-1333 o <mnourpower [at] gmail [dot] com>.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

Listo para un invierno cómodo con ahorro de energía: miércoles 15 de octubre de 6 a 8pm en el gimnasio de Corcoran Park

¿Estás buscando maneras de ahorrar energía y reducir las tarifas mensuales de utilidades? Ambos, dueños de casa e inquilinos te invitan a que atiendas a un taller de los fundamentos de eficiencia energética, el miércoles 15 de octubre.

CNO se enorgullece de la alianza con Our Power, una coalición del sur de Minneapolis enfocada en soluciones comunitarias y uso de energía sostenible, para auspiciar este evento de vecinos. Habrá una discusión sobre cómo ocurre comúnmente la pérdida de energía y de calefacción, maneras costeables de agrandar la insolación y más hábitos que debes saber para reducir costos de energía.

Los vecinos de Corcoran Marlena Needham y Timothy DenHerder-Thomas, líderes con la coalición Our Power, estarán moderando el taller con el experto en eficiencia del hogar, Jim Walsh.

Después de aprender los fundamentos de eficiencia energética del hogar, los presentes serán invitados a aportar su conocimiento en sus vecindarios, registrándose para celebrar una fiesta en sus casas o una fiesta de la cuadra. La coalición Our Power está ofreciendo proveer entrenadores, materiales, herramientas y ayudar a realizar varias fiestas como talleres de eficiencia en el corredor de la calle Lake.

Fecha: Miércoles 15 de octubre

Hora: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Ubicación: Gimnasio de Parque Corcoran, 3334 20th Ave S

Esto evento de la Organización Vecindario de Corcoran (CNO) es parte de los eventos o talleres mensuales de nuestro comunidad.Todos los residentes del vecindario de Corcoran se invita a todos a asistir y son considerados miembros del CNO, después de compartir su información de contacto en una hoja de registración.

Para más información sobre el evento del 15 de octubre, favor de contactar a Ross Joy al 612-724-7457 o <ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org>. Para organizar su propio taller de eficiencia energética, contacta a Marlena Needham al 612-548-1333 o <mnourpower [at] gmail [dot] com>.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

© 2014 Corcoran News

Junta de inquilinos establecida para el avance de mejoras a viviendas, próxima reunión, miércoles 22 de octubre

Fri, 2014-10-24 12:01
RossJoy Corcoran News

El 11 de septiembre, líderes residentes de departamentos en Corcoran votaron para formalizar nuestros esfuerzos de inquilino del vecindario en una Junta de Inquilinos.

Todos los inquilinos en el vecindario de Corcoran son animados a atender. El grupo discutirá asuntos compartidos y organizará un frente unido de familias, tomando acciones de liderazgo para asegurar que nuestro vecindario sea saludable y de calidad, accesible, costeable y estable. Los líderes reportarán acciones a y recibirán apoyo de la Mesa Directiva del CNO.

Qué: Junta de Inquilinos

Fecha: Miércoles 22 de octubre

Hora: de 6:00 p.m. a 7:30 p.m.

Locación: Salón 114 en el MPS edificio de Educación para Adultos, calle Lake 2225

La Junta de Inquilinos ha votado para que su primera meta prioritaria sea desafiar y/o reducir el radio en facturas de utilidades para gas y agua. Estas facturas, además de ser renta, han sido destructoras de presupuestos familiares y no han mejorado la eficiencia en energía de los edificios.

La segunda meta de la Junta de Inquilinos de Corcoran será el continuar obteniendo reparos necesarios para los apartamentos. Conversaciones y cartas a la administración de propiedades y la Ciudad de Minneapolis ha cedido mejoras substanciales a edificios departamentales. Múltiples familias han recibido reparaciones a aires acondicionados; rondas de fumigación; repintados pasillos y exteriores de los edificios; y remplazada alfombra vieja en algunas unidades.

La última meta votada y aprobada por la Junta de Inquilinos será tomar acciones que va a mejorar el sistema de renta de viviendas en Minneapolis. En la junta del 11 de septiembre, las líderes Reyna, Edain y Socorro todas declararon que no es suficiente para asegurar que sus familias tengan mejores viviendas. Cada líder comprometido a expandir la base de la Junta de familias involucrados para tener mayor poder comunitario, para reformar políticas y modelos de negocio que afectan a los residentes que rentan. Uno de los propietarios más grandes en Minneapolis está respondiendo. The Apartment Shop de Steven Frenz ha contratado a un hispanohablante miembro del equipo de la oficina, después de una petición de un inquilino.

Para más información sobre la Junta de Inquilinos contacta a Ross Joy al 612-724-7457 o <ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org>. Todos los miembros comunitarios también pueden involucrarse y liderar asuntos locales al atender a las juntas mensuales de nuestro Comité de Tierra y Vivienda, el cual se reúne en el primer jueves de cada mes (la próxima reunión el 2 de octubre a las 6pm en 3451 Cedar Ave S).

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

El 11 de septiembre, líderes residentes de departamentos en Corcoran votaron para formalizar nuestros esfuerzos de inquilino del vecindario en una Junta de Inquilinos.

Todos los inquilinos en el vecindario de Corcoran son animados a atender. El grupo discutirá asuntos compartidos y organizará un frente unido de familias, tomando acciones de liderazgo para asegurar que nuestro vecindario sea saludable y de calidad, accesible, costeable y estable. Los líderes reportarán acciones a y recibirán apoyo de la Mesa Directiva del CNO.

Qué: Junta de Inquilinos

Fecha: Miércoles 22 de octubre

Hora: de 6:00 p.m. a 7:30 p.m.

Locación: Salón 114 en el MPS edificio de Educación para Adultos, calle Lake 2225

La Junta de Inquilinos ha votado para que su primera meta prioritaria sea desafiar y/o reducir el radio en facturas de utilidades para gas y agua. Estas facturas, además de ser renta, han sido destructoras de presupuestos familiares y no han mejorado la eficiencia en energía de los edificios.

La segunda meta de la Junta de Inquilinos de Corcoran será el continuar obteniendo reparos necesarios para los apartamentos. Conversaciones y cartas a la administración de propiedades y la Ciudad de Minneapolis ha cedido mejoras substanciales a edificios departamentales. Múltiples familias han recibido reparaciones a aires acondicionados; rondas de fumigación; repintados pasillos y exteriores de los edificios; y remplazada alfombra vieja en algunas unidades.

La última meta votada y aprobada por la Junta de Inquilinos será tomar acciones que va a mejorar el sistema de renta de viviendas en Minneapolis. En la junta del 11 de septiembre, las líderes Reyna, Edain y Socorro todas declararon que no es suficiente para asegurar que sus familias tengan mejores viviendas. Cada líder comprometido a expandir la base de la Junta de familias involucrados para tener mayor poder comunitario, para reformar políticas y modelos de negocio que afectan a los residentes que rentan. Uno de los propietarios más grandes en Minneapolis está respondiendo. The Apartment Shop de Steven Frenz ha contratado a un hispanohablante miembro del equipo de la oficina, después de una petición de un inquilino.

Para más información sobre la Junta de Inquilinos contacta a Ross Joy al 612-724-7457 o <ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org>. Todos los miembros comunitarios también pueden involucrarse y liderar asuntos locales al atender a las juntas mensuales de nuestro Comité de Tierra y Vivienda, el cual se reúne en el primer jueves de cada mes (la próxima reunión el 2 de octubre a las 6pm en 3451 Cedar Ave S).

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

© 2014 Corcoran News

Se aproxima el cierre de la temporada con la llegada del otoño

Fri, 2014-10-24 11:59
Corcoran News

Creámoslo o no, el otoño ha llegado y la temporada del Mercado de Granjeros de Midtown se está acercando a su fin con el comienzo de la caída de las hojas y la caída de las temperaturas. Al adentrarnos en octubre, nos quedan sólo cuatro mercados sabatinos y cuatro mercados de los martes en esta temporada 2014. Aunque la temporada del mercado está apagándose, habrá todavía fantásticos artículos disponibles en el mercado y suficientes actividades para que vengan y disfruten. Asegúrense de almacenar verduras frescas y locales para enlatar en vinagre, y no se pierdan nuestras últimas oportunidades para disfrutar el mercado y visitar con amigos, vecinos y a nuestros comerciantes fabulosos antes del cierre de la temporada.

Algunas actividades que estarán realizándose durante el mes incluyen: una demostración de cocina de Midtown Flavors y nuestra campaña de recaudación de fondos #FeedtheCarrot, en el mercado el 4 de octubre; nuestra Actividad en Familia del segundo sábado y una Encuesta de Actividad Económica el 11 de octubre, en donde tendrán la oportunidad de ganar mercancía del mercado y fichas al tomar una encuesta breve con uno de nuestros voluntarios del mercado; y, Día de Apreciación al Comerciante el 18 de octubre, cuando nuestro Comité Concejal dará muestras de nuestra apreciación a nuestros comerciantes al preparar y servirles desayuno en el mercado. Siéntete libre de mostrar a tus comerciantes favoritos lo mucho que los aprecias. Si estás interesado en ser voluntario para cualquiera de estas grandiosas actividades, por favor contacta a nuestra Asistente de Gerente, Elena Haynes por correo electrónico info [at] midtownfarmersmarket [dot] org o llama al 612-724-74557.

Algunos artículos que encontrarás en el Mercado este mes incluyen: calabazas, manzanas, melones, elotes, brócoli, coliflor, chicharos, lentejas, colirrábano, repollo, zanahoria, rábano, nabos, chirivías, betabel, lechuga, espinaca, col rizada, acelga suiza, arugulo, bok choy, cebolla, poros, papas, calabaza de verano y calabacín, pepino, carne saludable, puerco y pollo de pastura, liebre, huevos, queso, yogurt, mantequilla, jaleas y mermeladas, mantequilla de maní, verduras enlatadas, miel, jarabe de maple, arroz salvaje, panes, granola, café, brochetas, hamburguesas, carne y sliders vegetarianos, tomate frito BLTs, tacos, burritos, tamales, pizzas al carbón, maíz hervido, cacahuate hervido y paletas de hielo. También encontrarás una amplia variedad de muebles hechos a mano y artes y artesanías locales.

El Mercado de Grajeros de Midtown está ubicado en la esquina de Calle East Lake y 22nd Avenue South y ofrece comidas frescas y locales cada sábado de 8:00 a.m. a 1:00 p.m., de mayo a junio; y martes de 3:00 p.m. a 7:00 p.m., de junio a octubre.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

Creámoslo o no, el otoño ha llegado y la temporada del Mercado de Granjeros de Midtown se está acercando a su fin con el comienzo de la caída de las hojas y la caída de las temperaturas. Al adentrarnos en octubre, nos quedan sólo cuatro mercados sabatinos y cuatro mercados de los martes en esta temporada 2014. Aunque la temporada del mercado está apagándose, habrá todavía fantásticos artículos disponibles en el mercado y suficientes actividades para que vengan y disfruten. Asegúrense de almacenar verduras frescas y locales para enlatar en vinagre, y no se pierdan nuestras últimas oportunidades para disfrutar el mercado y visitar con amigos, vecinos y a nuestros comerciantes fabulosos antes del cierre de la temporada.

Algunas actividades que estarán realizándose durante el mes incluyen: una demostración de cocina de Midtown Flavors y nuestra campaña de recaudación de fondos #FeedtheCarrot, en el mercado el 4 de octubre; nuestra Actividad en Familia del segundo sábado y una Encuesta de Actividad Económica el 11 de octubre, en donde tendrán la oportunidad de ganar mercancía del mercado y fichas al tomar una encuesta breve con uno de nuestros voluntarios del mercado; y, Día de Apreciación al Comerciante el 18 de octubre, cuando nuestro Comité Concejal dará muestras de nuestra apreciación a nuestros comerciantes al preparar y servirles desayuno en el mercado. Siéntete libre de mostrar a tus comerciantes favoritos lo mucho que los aprecias. Si estás interesado en ser voluntario para cualquiera de estas grandiosas actividades, por favor contacta a nuestra Asistente de Gerente, Elena Haynes por correo electrónico info [at] midtownfarmersmarket [dot] org o llama al 612-724-74557.

Algunos artículos que encontrarás en el Mercado este mes incluyen: calabazas, manzanas, melones, elotes, brócoli, coliflor, chicharos, lentejas, colirrábano, repollo, zanahoria, rábano, nabos, chirivías, betabel, lechuga, espinaca, col rizada, acelga suiza, arugulo, bok choy, cebolla, poros, papas, calabaza de verano y calabacín, pepino, carne saludable, puerco y pollo de pastura, liebre, huevos, queso, yogurt, mantequilla, jaleas y mermeladas, mantequilla de maní, verduras enlatadas, miel, jarabe de maple, arroz salvaje, panes, granola, café, brochetas, hamburguesas, carne y sliders vegetarianos, tomate frito BLTs, tacos, burritos, tamales, pizzas al carbón, maíz hervido, cacahuate hervido y paletas de hielo. También encontrarás una amplia variedad de muebles hechos a mano y artes y artesanías locales.

El Mercado de Grajeros de Midtown está ubicado en la esquina de Calle East Lake y 22nd Avenue South y ofrece comidas frescas y locales cada sábado de 8:00 a.m. a 1:00 p.m., de mayo a junio; y martes de 3:00 p.m. a 7:00 p.m., de junio a octubre.

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© 2014 Corcoran News

Residentes se suman al desarrollo de 2225 East Lake

Fri, 2014-10-24 11:57
Eric Gustafson Corcoran News

Cerca de 150 personas llegaron el 3 de abril a escuchar sobre los planes propuestos por Hennepin County para la compra y rediseño de 2225 East Lake, propiedad de 6.5 acres, entre la estación del tren ligero de Lake Street y el YWCA. Desde aquel tiempo, el Condado ha juntado a 2 grupos de trabajo de del gobierno, profesionales de diseño y residentes locales, para trabajar en el asunto relacionado al diseño sustentable y conexiones de trafico bici/peatones dentro del diseño. Cada uno de estos grupos se ha reunido una vez, y el CNO reunió información de residentes quienes participaron, incluyendo residentes de Corcoran como Jane St. Clair, Tami Traeger, John Paul, Benjamin Tsai, Billy Weber, Gerry Tyrrell, Heidi Traore, Jim Walsh y Peggy Knapp.

Atención prestada bici/peatón/ tráfico y quienes usan transporte, conexiones y facilidades.

“(Arreglos) la intersección de Lake y Hiawatha es CRUCIAL para el éxito de cualquier diseño en su sitio e inaceptable en su actual diseño céntrico para automóviles”

“Estoy en desacuerdo que la oficina del edificio será de 5 pisos, aunque el CNO esté bien con 6 a 10. Parece desperdicio usar zona cero para Desarrollo Orientado de Transito para un edificio de únicamente 5 pisos”

“Me gustaría definitivamente ver más esfuerzos progresistas para la construcción de este diseño, poner al peatón primero, bicis segundo y automóviles al último”.

“Muchos edificios en espacios pequeños, pero el Mercado de Granjeros es alivio bienvenido”.

“Me preocupa la decreciente venta al menudeo del primer piso de frente a la calle Lake; esta es una falta mayor del programa actual”

Atención prestada a asuntos de sustentabilidad.

“El condado claramente va a dar poca importancia a este desarrollo. No he visto evidencia de liderazgo para traer innovación a este sitio. El edificio no está siendo construido para demostrar un compromiso a los valores y principios que el vecindario ha acogido, promovido, y por los que ha luchado y, claramente, comunicado”

“(El condado) necesita hacer más y elegir un asunto importante o dos para abogar por el proyecto”

“El condado y el diseñador ignoraron quejas sobre aguas residuales, jardinería y agricultura urbana, y presionar con fuerza sobre un diseño sustentable”

“Siento que la mayoría de decisiones ya fueron hechas”

Calificación del desarrollo propuesto como un lugar para vivir.

“Necesitamos más información sobre precio, y más claridad sobre como lucirá la plaza pública ya que esto será el espacio al aire libre para disfrutar.”

“Una localidad increíblemente densa en población, próxima a un centro de servicio que creará altos niveles de trafico de transeúntes todos los días. ¡Un lugar tan desagradable para vivir!”

Calificando el desarrollo propuesto como una adición de valor para mi vecindario.

“El Mercado lo convierte en un maravilloso lugar”

“Me preocupa la mezcla de usos inclinados a servicios sociales sin servicio para todos los residentes en el área para crear un vecindario de ingresos mixtos”

“Esto depende en qué es valorado. Incrementar valores de propiedad no es la consideración más importante. La adición de un centro comunitario permanente con una sede para el mercado de grajeros es importante. Es critico asegurarse que diseñamos este lugar para el futuro, con la consideración de acceso para peatones y bicicletas y reducción de carros”

“Más opciones de vivienda son necesarias. Y más densidad en el centro del transporte que es Hi-Lake ayudaría a dar a nuestro vecindario un punto más urbano y más fuerte”

Eric Gustafson es el director ejecutivo de CNO.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

Cerca de 150 personas llegaron el 3 de abril a escuchar sobre los planes propuestos por Hennepin County para la compra y rediseño de 2225 East Lake, propiedad de 6.5 acres, entre la estación del tren ligero de Lake Street y el YWCA. Desde aquel tiempo, el Condado ha juntado a 2 grupos de trabajo de del gobierno, profesionales de diseño y residentes locales, para trabajar en el asunto relacionado al diseño sustentable y conexiones de trafico bici/peatones dentro del diseño. Cada uno de estos grupos se ha reunido una vez, y el CNO reunió información de residentes quienes participaron, incluyendo residentes de Corcoran como Jane St. Clair, Tami Traeger, John Paul, Benjamin Tsai, Billy Weber, Gerry Tyrrell, Heidi Traore, Jim Walsh y Peggy Knapp.

Atención prestada bici/peatón/ tráfico y quienes usan transporte, conexiones y facilidades.

“(Arreglos) la intersección de Lake y Hiawatha es CRUCIAL para el éxito de cualquier diseño en su sitio e inaceptable en su actual diseño céntrico para automóviles”

“Estoy en desacuerdo que la oficina del edificio será de 5 pisos, aunque el CNO esté bien con 6 a 10. Parece desperdicio usar zona cero para Desarrollo Orientado de Transito para un edificio de únicamente 5 pisos”

“Me gustaría definitivamente ver más esfuerzos progresistas para la construcción de este diseño, poner al peatón primero, bicis segundo y automóviles al último”.

“Muchos edificios en espacios pequeños, pero el Mercado de Granjeros es alivio bienvenido”.

“Me preocupa la decreciente venta al menudeo del primer piso de frente a la calle Lake; esta es una falta mayor del programa actual”

Atención prestada a asuntos de sustentabilidad.

“El condado claramente va a dar poca importancia a este desarrollo. No he visto evidencia de liderazgo para traer innovación a este sitio. El edificio no está siendo construido para demostrar un compromiso a los valores y principios que el vecindario ha acogido, promovido, y por los que ha luchado y, claramente, comunicado”

“(El condado) necesita hacer más y elegir un asunto importante o dos para abogar por el proyecto”

“El condado y el diseñador ignoraron quejas sobre aguas residuales, jardinería y agricultura urbana, y presionar con fuerza sobre un diseño sustentable”

“Siento que la mayoría de decisiones ya fueron hechas”

Calificación del desarrollo propuesto como un lugar para vivir.

“Necesitamos más información sobre precio, y más claridad sobre como lucirá la plaza pública ya que esto será el espacio al aire libre para disfrutar.”

“Una localidad increíblemente densa en población, próxima a un centro de servicio que creará altos niveles de trafico de transeúntes todos los días. ¡Un lugar tan desagradable para vivir!”

Calificando el desarrollo propuesto como una adición de valor para mi vecindario.

“El Mercado lo convierte en un maravilloso lugar”

“Me preocupa la mezcla de usos inclinados a servicios sociales sin servicio para todos los residentes en el área para crear un vecindario de ingresos mixtos”

“Esto depende en qué es valorado. Incrementar valores de propiedad no es la consideración más importante. La adición de un centro comunitario permanente con una sede para el mercado de grajeros es importante. Es critico asegurarse que diseñamos este lugar para el futuro, con la consideración de acceso para peatones y bicicletas y reducción de carros”

“Más opciones de vivienda son necesarias. Y más densidad en el centro del transporte que es Hi-Lake ayudaría a dar a nuestro vecindario un punto más urbano y más fuerte”

Eric Gustafson es el director ejecutivo de CNO.

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Click here for current edition.

© 2014 Corcoran News

Affordable solar will allow residents to save money

Fri, 2014-10-24 11:49
Corcoran News

The cost of solar panels has dropped 99% since 1977. In Minnesota, the long-term electricity cost from solar has decreased below the rising cost of utility bills. Now, local residents are making solar accessible for everyone through a member-owned cooperative, Cooperative Energy Futures (CEF).

Homeowners can join the co-op and apply for the Made in Minnesota solar incentive to lease solar panels with no money down through the Gopher Solar program. After 15 years, residents have full ownership of their array, which is warrantied for another 10 years of free power. As Holly & Dan, Minneapolis participants in the 2014 leasing program, said, “CEF and its partners have made it possible for us to produce renewable energy! We are so grateful for this opportunity and can attest to how understandable and easy the process was.” There are also loan options if residents prefer to own the system upfront. Because applications for the Minnesota solar incentive are due February 28, 2015, interested residents should contact bruce [at] cooperativeenergyfutures [dot] com or (612) 568-2334 before January 15th 2015.

But what about renters or families without good solar access? CEF is also helping Twin Cities communities organize solar gardens, large solar arrays that give renters and residents whose homes won’t work for solar the opportunity to subscribe. Just like buying a farm share, subscribing to community solar secures utility bill credits for 25 years of power. While most Minnesota homes spend $900/year on electricity bills, community solar can provide 25 years of power for only around 12 years worth of cost. As a cooperative, CEF gives community solar subscribers ownership and control over a community energy business. Learn more at http://cooperativeenergyfutures.com/communitysolar/.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

The cost of solar panels has dropped 99% since 1977. In Minnesota, the long-term electricity cost from solar has decreased below the rising cost of utility bills. Now, local residents are making solar accessible for everyone through a member-owned cooperative, Cooperative Energy Futures (CEF).

Homeowners can join the co-op and apply for the Made in Minnesota solar incentive to lease solar panels with no money down through the Gopher Solar program. After 15 years, residents have full ownership of their array, which is warrantied for another 10 years of free power. As Holly & Dan, Minneapolis participants in the 2014 leasing program, said, “CEF and its partners have made it possible for us to produce renewable energy! We are so grateful for this opportunity and can attest to how understandable and easy the process was.” There are also loan options if residents prefer to own the system upfront. Because applications for the Minnesota solar incentive are due February 28, 2015, interested residents should contact bruce [at] cooperativeenergyfutures [dot] com or (612) 568-2334 before January 15th 2015.

But what about renters or families without good solar access? CEF is also helping Twin Cities communities organize solar gardens, large solar arrays that give renters and residents whose homes won’t work for solar the opportunity to subscribe. Just like buying a farm share, subscribing to community solar secures utility bill credits for 25 years of power. While most Minnesota homes spend $900/year on electricity bills, community solar can provide 25 years of power for only around 12 years worth of cost. As a cooperative, CEF gives community solar subscribers ownership and control over a community energy business. Learn more at http://cooperativeenergyfutures.com/communitysolar/.

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

© 2014 Corcoran News

Tenants' council established to advance housing improvements, next meeting Wednesday, October 22

Fri, 2014-10-24 11:45
RossJoy Corcoran News

On September 11, apartment resident leaders in Corcoran voted to formalize our neighborhood’s tenant organizing efforts into an open Tenants’ Council, or La junta de inquilinos.

All renters in Corcoran are encouraged to attend. The group will discuss shared concerns and organize a united front of families taking leadership actions to ensure our neighborhood’s housing is healthy and of quality, accessible, affordable and stable. Leaders will report actions to and receive support from CNO’s Board of Directors.

What: Tenants’ Council meeting

Date: Wednesday, October 22

Time: 6:00-7:30pm

Location: Room 114 at MPS Adult Education building, 2225 E Lake Street

The Tenants’ Council has voted that its first priority goal is to challenge and/or lower the emerging practice of ratio utility bills for gas and water. These bills, on top of rent, have wrecked family budgets, resulted in evictions, and have not improved building energy efficiency.

The Council’s second goal is be to continue obtaining needed home repairs. Tenants’ conversations with and letters to property management and the City of Minneapolis have yielded substantial improvements to apartment buildings. These include replacement of long-broken air conditioners; fumigation for pests; building exteriors and hallways have been repainted; and torn carpet has been replaced for some select units.

The last voted goal of the Tenants’ Council will be to take actions that improve systems related to rental housing in Minneapolis. At the Sept 11 meeting, leaders Reyna, Edain and Socorro all voiced that it is not enough to ensure that just their families have better housing. Each leader committed to further expand the Council’s base of engaged households in order to have greater community power to reform policies and business models that affect residents who rent. One of the largest landlords in Minneapolis is already responding. The Apartment Shop has hired a Spanish speaking office staff member after a tenant driven petition.

For more info about the Tenants’ Council contact Ross Joy at 612-724-7457 or ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org. All community members can also get involved and lead on local issues by attending our neighborhood’s monthly Land Use & Housing Committee, which meets on the first Thursday of every month (next on October 2 at 6:00pm at 3451 Cedar Ave S).

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

On September 11, apartment resident leaders in Corcoran voted to formalize our neighborhood’s tenant organizing efforts into an open Tenants’ Council, or La junta de inquilinos.

All renters in Corcoran are encouraged to attend. The group will discuss shared concerns and organize a united front of families taking leadership actions to ensure our neighborhood’s housing is healthy and of quality, accessible, affordable and stable. Leaders will report actions to and receive support from CNO’s Board of Directors.

What: Tenants’ Council meeting

Date: Wednesday, October 22

Time: 6:00-7:30pm

Location: Room 114 at MPS Adult Education building, 2225 E Lake Street

The Tenants’ Council has voted that its first priority goal is to challenge and/or lower the emerging practice of ratio utility bills for gas and water. These bills, on top of rent, have wrecked family budgets, resulted in evictions, and have not improved building energy efficiency.

The Council’s second goal is be to continue obtaining needed home repairs. Tenants’ conversations with and letters to property management and the City of Minneapolis have yielded substantial improvements to apartment buildings. These include replacement of long-broken air conditioners; fumigation for pests; building exteriors and hallways have been repainted; and torn carpet has been replaced for some select units.

The last voted goal of the Tenants’ Council will be to take actions that improve systems related to rental housing in Minneapolis. At the Sept 11 meeting, leaders Reyna, Edain and Socorro all voiced that it is not enough to ensure that just their families have better housing. Each leader committed to further expand the Council’s base of engaged households in order to have greater community power to reform policies and business models that affect residents who rent. One of the largest landlords in Minneapolis is already responding. The Apartment Shop has hired a Spanish speaking office staff member after a tenant driven petition.

For more info about the Tenants’ Council contact Ross Joy at 612-724-7457 or ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org. All community members can also get involved and lead on local issues by attending our neighborhood’s monthly Land Use & Housing Committee, which meets on the first Thursday of every month (next on October 2 at 6:00pm at 3451 Cedar Ave S).

Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
Click here for current edition.

© 2014 Corcoran News

    Community workshop: Home Weatherization 101

    Fri, 2014-10-24 11:42
    RossJoy Corcoran News

    Ready for a cozy winter with energy saving tips on Wednesday, October 15 from 6-8pm at Corcoran Park gym.

    Looking for ways to save energy and cut your monthly utility bills? Both homeowners and renters are invited to attend a Home Weatherization Workshop on Wednesday, October 15th.

    CNO is proud to partner with Our Power, a South Minneapolis coalition focusing on community solutions to sustainable energy use, to host this neighborhood event. There will be discussion on how heat and energy loss occur, affordable ways to enhance insulation and more need-to-know habits to reduce energy costs.

    Corcoran residents Marlena Needham and Timothy DenHerder-Thomas, leaders with the Our Power coalition, will be facilitating the evening event along with home efficiency expert Jim Walsh.

    After learning the basics of home weatherization, attendees will have the option to sign up to host a similarly themed house party or block party with their neighbors. The Our Power coalition is offering to provide trainers, materials, tools and help setting up weatherization work parties throughout the Lake Street corridor.

    Date: Wednesday, October 15th

    Time: 6:00 – 8:00pm

    Location: Corcoran Park gym, 3334 20th Ave S

    This CNO event is part of our neighborhood’s monthly hosting of an event or workshop. All residents of Corcoran neighborhood are invited to attend and are considered members of CNO after sharing their contact information on the sign-in sheet.

    For more information about the October 15th event please contact Ross Joy at 612-724-7457 or ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org. To host your own weatherization work party contact Marlena Needham at (612) 548-1333 or mnourpower [at] gmail [dot] com.

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    Ready for a cozy winter with energy saving tips on Wednesday, October 15 from 6-8pm at Corcoran Park gym.

    Looking for ways to save energy and cut your monthly utility bills? Both homeowners and renters are invited to attend a Home Weatherization Workshop on Wednesday, October 15th.

    CNO is proud to partner with Our Power, a South Minneapolis coalition focusing on community solutions to sustainable energy use, to host this neighborhood event. There will be discussion on how heat and energy loss occur, affordable ways to enhance insulation and more need-to-know habits to reduce energy costs.

    Corcoran residents Marlena Needham and Timothy DenHerder-Thomas, leaders with the Our Power coalition, will be facilitating the evening event along with home efficiency expert Jim Walsh.

    After learning the basics of home weatherization, attendees will have the option to sign up to host a similarly themed house party or block party with their neighbors. The Our Power coalition is offering to provide trainers, materials, tools and help setting up weatherization work parties throughout the Lake Street corridor.

    Date: Wednesday, October 15th

    Time: 6:00 – 8:00pm

    Location: Corcoran Park gym, 3334 20th Ave S

    This CNO event is part of our neighborhood’s monthly hosting of an event or workshop. All residents of Corcoran neighborhood are invited to attend and are considered members of CNO after sharing their contact information on the sign-in sheet.

    For more information about the October 15th event please contact Ross Joy at 612-724-7457 or ross [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org. To host your own weatherization work party contact Marlena Needham at (612) 548-1333 or mnourpower [at] gmail [dot] com.

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    © 2014 Corcoran News

    Share the Harvest: Donate locally-grown produce to families in need

    Fri, 2014-10-24 11:40
    Corcoran News

    Share the harvest is a CNO program allowing gardeners and farmer’s market shoppers to contribute locally-grown produce to Sisters’ Camelot, a reputable local organization that offers free produce and free meals to hungry Minneapolis residents through its colorful mobile food share bus.

    Share the harvest will accept your donation at the Midtown Farmers Market through the end of the Market season. Find the main market table and the “Share the Harvest” donation box. Donate produce you’ve purchased at the farmers market or produce you’ve grown at home without the use of chemicals. Sisters’ Camelot will take it from there!

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    Share the harvest is a CNO program allowing gardeners and farmer’s market shoppers to contribute locally-grown produce to Sisters’ Camelot, a reputable local organization that offers free produce and free meals to hungry Minneapolis residents through its colorful mobile food share bus.

    Share the harvest will accept your donation at the Midtown Farmers Market through the end of the Market season. Find the main market table and the “Share the Harvest” donation box. Donate produce you’ve purchased at the farmers market or produce you’ve grown at home without the use of chemicals. Sisters’ Camelot will take it from there!

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    © 2014 Corcoran News

    Event recaps: Clean Sweep, gardening workshop

    Fri, 2014-10-24 11:37
    Corcoran News

    On August 20th, CNO hosted an informational workshop with local gardening expert Marcus Larson. Corcoran neighbors stopped by the Corcoran Community Garden (3301 34th Ave S) to walk through the green space, and learn a few tips. Now that growing season is mostly over, Marcus recommended “topping” or cutting off the top vertical stem of tomato plants in order to focus the plant’s energy on ripping its fruit. Marcus also shared a recipe and taste of refrigerator pickles, which were very delicious.

    Check out the Corcoran Community Garden’s facebook page for more updates about the garden, or contact Ross Joy (612-724-7457) for info about CNO’s monthly membership events.

    Peter Scholtz (left) and Laura LeFebure volunteered on the Saturday morning of September 20th for Corcoran’s Clean Sweep 2014 event.  Working in three teams, we were able to pick up debris and tires from over 45 homes and brought 8 full truck loads to the Southside Waste Transfer Station. Shout out to the all the volunteers including Kathleen Hoffer, John Paul, Devin Tomczik, Licey, Marcus Larson and Ben Linzmeier. Big thanks also to Gwen McMahon, Wendy Knox, May Day Café and Chatterbox Pub for donating food.

    For more info about debris disposal visit http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/solid-waste/. Contact Ross Joy (612-724-7457) for feedback or more details about CNO’s monthly membership events.

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    On August 20th, CNO hosted an informational workshop with local gardening expert Marcus Larson. Corcoran neighbors stopped by the Corcoran Community Garden (3301 34th Ave S) to walk through the green space, and learn a few tips. Now that growing season is mostly over, Marcus recommended “topping” or cutting off the top vertical stem of tomato plants in order to focus the plant’s energy on ripping its fruit. Marcus also shared a recipe and taste of refrigerator pickles, which were very delicious.

    Check out the Corcoran Community Garden’s facebook page for more updates about the garden, or contact Ross Joy (612-724-7457) for info about CNO’s monthly membership events.

    Peter Scholtz (left) and Laura LeFebure volunteered on the Saturday morning of September 20th for Corcoran’s Clean Sweep 2014 event.  Working in three teams, we were able to pick up debris and tires from over 45 homes and brought 8 full truck loads to the Southside Waste Transfer Station. Shout out to the all the volunteers including Kathleen Hoffer, John Paul, Devin Tomczik, Licey, Marcus Larson and Ben Linzmeier. Big thanks also to Gwen McMahon, Wendy Knox, May Day Café and Chatterbox Pub for donating food.

    For more info about debris disposal visit http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/solid-waste/. Contact Ross Joy (612-724-7457) for feedback or more details about CNO’s monthly membership events.

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    © 2014 Corcoran News

    Market season draws to a close as autumn arrives

    Fri, 2014-10-24 11:31
    Corcoran News

    Believe it or not, autumn has arrived and the Midtown Farmers Market season is nearing its end as the leaves begin to fall and the temperatures start to drop. As we head into October there are only 4 remaining Saturday markets and 4 Tuesday markets left in the 2014 season! Although the market season is winding down there will still be plenty of great items available at the market and plenty of activities to come out and enjoy. Be sure to stock up on fresh, local veggies for canning and pickling and don’t miss your final opportunities to enjoy the market and visit with friends, neighbors and our wonderful vendors before the season draws to a close!

    Some exciting activities that will be happening during the month include: a Midtown Flavors cooking demo and our final #FeedtheCarrot fund drive at the market on October 4th; our 2nd Saturday Family Activity and an Economic Activity Survey on October 11th, where you’ll have the opportunity to win market merchandise and tokens by taking a quick survey with one of our market volunteers; and Vendor Appreciation Day on October 18th, when our Advisory Committee will show our appreciation for our vendor by preparing and serving them breakfast at the market. Feel free to show your favorites vendors how much you appreciate them in your own way as well! If you’re interested in volunteering for any of these great activities, please contact our Assistant Manager, Elena Haynes by emailing info [at] midtownfarmersmarket [dot] org or calling 612-724-7457.

    Some items you’ll find at the market this month include: pumpkins, apples, melons, sweet corn, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, green beans, kohlrabi, cabbage, carrots, radishes, turnips, parsnips, beets, lettuce, spinach, kale, swiss chard, arugula, bok choy, onions, leeks, potatoes, summer squash and zucchini, cucumbers, grass-fed beef, pasture raised pork and chicken, lamb, eggs, cheese, yogurt, butter, jams and jellies, peanut butter, pickled veggies, honey, maple syrup, wild rice, breads, granola, coffee, tea, scones, croissants, cookies, fruit tarts, breakfast pastries, sambusas, breakfast sandwiches, omelets, kabobs, burgers, beef and vegetarian sliders, fried tomato BLTs, tacos, burritos, tamales, wood-fired pizza, kettle corn, boiled peanuts and popsicles. You’ll also find a wide range of handmade furniture and local arts and crafts.

    The Midtown Farmers Market is located at the corner of East Lake Street and 22nd Avenue South and offers fresh, local goods every Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm from May-June and Tuesday from 3:00pm-7:00pm June-October.

    Miguel Goebel is the market manager.

    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
    Click here for current edition.

    Believe it or not, autumn has arrived and the Midtown Farmers Market season is nearing its end as the leaves begin to fall and the temperatures start to drop. As we head into October there are only 4 remaining Saturday markets and 4 Tuesday markets left in the 2014 season! Although the market season is winding down there will still be plenty of great items available at the market and plenty of activities to come out and enjoy. Be sure to stock up on fresh, local veggies for canning and pickling and don’t miss your final opportunities to enjoy the market and visit with friends, neighbors and our wonderful vendors before the season draws to a close!

    Some exciting activities that will be happening during the month include: a Midtown Flavors cooking demo and our final #FeedtheCarrot fund drive at the market on October 4th; our 2nd Saturday Family Activity and an Economic Activity Survey on October 11th, where you’ll have the opportunity to win market merchandise and tokens by taking a quick survey with one of our market volunteers; and Vendor Appreciation Day on October 18th, when our Advisory Committee will show our appreciation for our vendor by preparing and serving them breakfast at the market. Feel free to show your favorites vendors how much you appreciate them in your own way as well! If you’re interested in volunteering for any of these great activities, please contact our Assistant Manager, Elena Haynes by emailing info [at] midtownfarmersmarket [dot] org or calling 612-724-7457.

    Some items you’ll find at the market this month include: pumpkins, apples, melons, sweet corn, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, green beans, kohlrabi, cabbage, carrots, radishes, turnips, parsnips, beets, lettuce, spinach, kale, swiss chard, arugula, bok choy, onions, leeks, potatoes, summer squash and zucchini, cucumbers, grass-fed beef, pasture raised pork and chicken, lamb, eggs, cheese, yogurt, butter, jams and jellies, peanut butter, pickled veggies, honey, maple syrup, wild rice, breads, granola, coffee, tea, scones, croissants, cookies, fruit tarts, breakfast pastries, sambusas, breakfast sandwiches, omelets, kabobs, burgers, beef and vegetarian sliders, fried tomato BLTs, tacos, burritos, tamales, wood-fired pizza, kettle corn, boiled peanuts and popsicles. You’ll also find a wide range of handmade furniture and local arts and crafts.

    The Midtown Farmers Market is located at the corner of East Lake Street and 22nd Avenue South and offers fresh, local goods every Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm from May-June and Tuesday from 3:00pm-7:00pm June-October.

    Miguel Goebel is the market manager.

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    Click here for current edition.

    © 2014 Corcoran News

      Jordan Area Community Council celebrates 50 years improving community

      Thu, 2014-10-23 13:47
      Margo Ashmore North News

      Fifty years ago, parents and other community members rallied to save a library, and in the process founded one of the longest-enduring organizations in the city, what is now Jordan Area Community Council.

      Back then, the library was a tiny branch contained within Jordan Junior High, at 29th between Irving and James. And about that time as yet other libraries were short on funds, the idea was floated of merging with the Hennepin County system, which became reality 40-some years later. But I digress. They lost the Jordan branch and the North branch, but eventually gained North Regional, and the Webber Park branch was allowed to stay.

      In 1964, the Jordan Area Action Committee, as it was organized a few months after the first library scare, concerned themselves with the area from Broadway and its natural extension along Golden Valley Road, to Dowling, the Mississippi to the city limits. That was the attendance area of Jordan Junior High, said J.S. Futcher, an organizer of the first group who recently wrote a book on the intertwined stories of the library and JACC. He presented slides and commentary at JACC’s 50th Anniversary event October 16. He noted that at the time, there were no other geographic or community groups that they would be stepping on.

      Right: J.S. Futcher accepts a token of recognition from current Executive Director Cathy Spann.

      While waiting for and watchdogging the administrative wheels turning on the library front, this band of residents who paid dues of a dollar or two put energies toward addressing dilapidated housing. Finding out that the city had no mechanism for dealing with it, they approached their legislators. Their efforts led to the city having an Office of Hazardous Buildings, and a way to not have taxes rise automatically when property is improved.

      Back then, the streets weren’t paved, they were oil and sand. The carrot was federal money to help with 90 percent of the street paving costs, the stick was the city had to inspect every residence inside and out, for code compliance. JACC welcomed that challenge and established a neighborhood conservation district.

      JACC archives show other sweeping efforts, from “garbage days” renamed Clean Sweeps, to sending out flyers in 1965 asking people to commit to certain home fixup activities such as picking up litter, fixing sagging fences or porches, tearing down dilapidated sheds, planting shrubs, flowers, and grass seed. First National Bank of Minneapolis’ West Broadway office sponsored the activity and said to watch for local business’ ads for specials on cleanup products. Neighbors were to post their yellow flyer in their windows; if they could see that at least 50 percent of the block was committed, they could call in and receive special recognition.

      Left: “Needles” sign from anti-drug marches in the early 1990s. Right: Then Aldermen Van White, Sandra Hilary, Alice Rainville and Mayor Don Fraser at a JACC event in the mid to late 1980s.

      Even early efforts stressed fixup/cleanup and did not call for tearing down. Later campaigns, such as in the late ‘80s-early 90s “Dirty Thirty” and “Block Out Drugs” were aimed at cleaning out bad behaviors and rectifying code violations. The group went to great lengths to move houses off the new Jordan School site; an effort that moved fewer homes than anticipated and did not produce the home ownership expected, rather high-quality rentals, according to their report to the Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP).

      Current president Jeff Skrenes, in his report, stated that the organization had worked a lot this past year on re-starting housing programs such as downpayment assistance for new buyers, fix-up loans and emergency repair loans, needed as the depressed housing market had made it tough to borrow against non-existent home equity.

      JACC was one of the first neighborhood groups to receive large amounts of funding through NRP in the early 1990s. At the anniversary program, Fourth Ward Council Member Barb Johnson noted that all the organizations now north of Lowry formed because of NRP. JACC’s current boundaries are Broadway on the south and west, Lowry on the north and Emerson on the east.

      Fifth Ward Council Member Blong Yang’s home is in Jordan, and he was a soccer coach with Jay Clark. Clark was JACC Director from 1988 to 1993 and now works through an organizer/volunteer training program at the University of Minnesota. He works with youth soccer in what are largely Hmong and Latino communities. Clark popped in toward the end of the meeting after a soccer game. As did they all, he commented on the festive tables and lovely party atmosphere.

      Both council members spoke of JACC’s having had some bumps along the way, an understatement, understandable in light of the overall celebratory mood.

      During the one bit of annual meeting business they needed to conduct, a bylaw change, Dennis Wagner brought up the history of why the bylaws were written the way they were, to prevent board stacking. The matter was eventually tabled, and will require a special meeting to resolve, attempting to come into compliance with city funding requirements. Those requirements which allow attendance tests for running for the board, but prohibit charging money or an attendance standard in order to vote.

      During the festivities, in addition to Futcher’s talk, Ed Enstrom spoke on behalf of a table full of people who were active in the 1980s including Bette Luick and her daughters, and Delores Petersen.

      Mayor Betsy Hodges spoke and gave the organization a recognition plaque.

      Polly Peterson, active for 20-plus years, received special recognition as she prepared to take “a sabbatical” encouraging others to step forward: “it’s a great education.”

      Left: Polly Peterson encourages others to step forward and get active in JACC.

      JACC is in need of additional board members; anyone interested may be elected to the board by the existing members since there were no nominations at the annual meeting.

      For more information about the organization, go to the Facebook page, Jordan Area Community Council, or call 612-886-4539. Offices are in the St. Olaf Lutheran Church at 2900 Fremont Ave. N. Cathy Spann is Executive Director, Joann Osgood, Administrative Coordinator, and Faith Xiong, Outreach Coordinator.

      (Archive photos courtesy of JACC, current photos by Margo Ashmore)

      Fifty years ago, parents and other community members rallied to save a library, and in the process founded one of the longest-enduring organizations in the city, what is now Jordan Area Community Council.

      Back then, the library was a tiny branch contained within Jordan Junior High, at 29th between Irving and James. And about that time as yet other libraries were short on funds, the idea was floated of merging with the Hennepin County system, which became reality 40-some years later. But I digress. They lost the Jordan branch and the North branch, but eventually gained North Regional, and the Webber Park branch was allowed to stay.

      In 1964, the Jordan Area Action Committee, as it was organized a few months after the first library scare, concerned themselves with the area from Broadway and its natural extension along Golden Valley Road, to Dowling, the Mississippi to the city limits. That was the attendance area of Jordan Junior High, said J.S. Futcher, an organizer of the first group who recently wrote a book on the intertwined stories of the library and JACC. He presented slides and commentary at JACC’s 50th Anniversary event October 16. He noted that at the time, there were no other geographic or community groups that they would be stepping on.

      Right: J.S. Futcher accepts a token of recognition from current Executive Director Cathy Spann.

      While waiting for and watchdogging the administrative wheels turning on the library front, this band of residents who paid dues of a dollar or two put energies toward addressing dilapidated housing. Finding out that the city had no mechanism for dealing with it, they approached their legislators. Their efforts led to the city having an Office of Hazardous Buildings, and a way to not have taxes rise automatically when property is improved.

      Back then, the streets weren’t paved, they were oil and sand. The carrot was federal money to help with 90 percent of the street paving costs, the stick was the city had to inspect every residence inside and out, for code compliance. JACC welcomed that challenge and established a neighborhood conservation district.

      JACC archives show other sweeping efforts, from “garbage days” renamed Clean Sweeps, to sending out flyers in 1965 asking people to commit to certain home fixup activities such as picking up litter, fixing sagging fences or porches, tearing down dilapidated sheds, planting shrubs, flowers, and grass seed. First National Bank of Minneapolis’ West Broadway office sponsored the activity and said to watch for local business’ ads for specials on cleanup products. Neighbors were to post their yellow flyer in their windows; if they could see that at least 50 percent of the block was committed, they could call in and receive special recognition.

      Left: “Needles” sign from anti-drug marches in the early 1990s. Right: Then Aldermen Van White, Sandra Hilary, Alice Rainville and Mayor Don Fraser at a JACC event in the mid to late 1980s.

      Even early efforts stressed fixup/cleanup and did not call for tearing down. Later campaigns, such as in the late ‘80s-early 90s “Dirty Thirty” and “Block Out Drugs” were aimed at cleaning out bad behaviors and rectifying code violations. The group went to great lengths to move houses off the new Jordan School site; an effort that moved fewer homes than anticipated and did not produce the home ownership expected, rather high-quality rentals, according to their report to the Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP).

      Current president Jeff Skrenes, in his report, stated that the organization had worked a lot this past year on re-starting housing programs such as downpayment assistance for new buyers, fix-up loans and emergency repair loans, needed as the depressed housing market had made it tough to borrow against non-existent home equity.

      JACC was one of the first neighborhood groups to receive large amounts of funding through NRP in the early 1990s. At the anniversary program, Fourth Ward Council Member Barb Johnson noted that all the organizations now north of Lowry formed because of NRP. JACC’s current boundaries are Broadway on the south and west, Lowry on the north and Emerson on the east.

      Fifth Ward Council Member Blong Yang’s home is in Jordan, and he was a soccer coach with Jay Clark. Clark was JACC Director from 1988 to 1993 and now works through an organizer/volunteer training program at the University of Minnesota. He works with youth soccer in what are largely Hmong and Latino communities. Clark popped in toward the end of the meeting after a soccer game. As did they all, he commented on the festive tables and lovely party atmosphere.

      Both council members spoke of JACC’s having had some bumps along the way, an understatement, understandable in light of the overall celebratory mood.

      During the one bit of annual meeting business they needed to conduct, a bylaw change, Dennis Wagner brought up the history of why the bylaws were written the way they were, to prevent board stacking. The matter was eventually tabled, and will require a special meeting to resolve, attempting to come into compliance with city funding requirements. Those requirements which allow attendance tests for running for the board, but prohibit charging money or an attendance standard in order to vote.

      During the festivities, in addition to Futcher’s talk, Ed Enstrom spoke on behalf of a table full of people who were active in the 1980s including Bette Luick and her daughters, and Delores Petersen.

      Mayor Betsy Hodges spoke and gave the organization a recognition plaque.

      Polly Peterson, active for 20-plus years, received special recognition as she prepared to take “a sabbatical” encouraging others to step forward: “it’s a great education.”

      Left: Polly Peterson encourages others to step forward and get active in JACC.

      JACC is in need of additional board members; anyone interested may be elected to the board by the existing members since there were no nominations at the annual meeting.

      For more information about the organization, go to the Facebook page, Jordan Area Community Council, or call 612-886-4539. Offices are in the St. Olaf Lutheran Church at 2900 Fremont Ave. N. Cathy Spann is Executive Director, Joann Osgood, Administrative Coordinator, and Faith Xiong, Outreach Coordinator.

      (Archive photos courtesy of JACC, current photos by Margo Ashmore)

      © 2014 North News

      WEQY-FM 104.7, the 'Voice of the East Side'

      Thu, 2014-10-23 13:13
      carla riehle Dayton's Bluff Forum

      Not long after this newspaper reaches your mailbox, WEQY-FM, the Voice of the East Side, hopes to be “riding the signal,” which is what radio veterans call the test phase of the new station. Although a major obstacle arose at the last minute that seemed like it might delay the start for a few months, that cloud turned out to have a silver lining. Despite the best efforts of Sonia Ortega, owner of Plaza del Sol on Payne Avenue, construction delays were not able to be overcome in building the radio space that she had generously offered to the station at no cost. However, the offer of new space in a historic building came along at just the right moment, with the added bonus that a storefront studio will be possible. WEQY Station Manager Kathryn Harris can't reveal the address yet, but says it looks about 99% sure.

      We are happy to report that Barry Madore's radio-novela project is one of the finalists for several Knight Foundation grants to be awarded in October. Kathryn Harris is also in discussion with two cultural umbrella groups about an innovative idea for combining station underwriting with radio programming and fundraising for the member organizations.

      Volunteer positions are still open at the station, ranging from answering the phone and staffing the front desk to acting as a “traffic” engineer. If you want to contribute to the community in an innovative way, contact Station Manager Kathryn Harris at WEQYKathryn [at] gmail [dot] com.

      Related stories:

      Not long after this newspaper reaches your mailbox, WEQY-FM, the Voice of the East Side, hopes to be “riding the signal,” which is what radio veterans call the test phase of the new station. Although a major obstacle arose at the last minute that seemed like it might delay the start for a few months, that cloud turned out to have a silver lining. Despite the best efforts of Sonia Ortega, owner of Plaza del Sol on Payne Avenue, construction delays were not able to be overcome in building the radio space that she had generously offered to the station at no cost. However, the offer of new space in a historic building came along at just the right moment, with the added bonus that a storefront studio will be possible. WEQY Station Manager Kathryn Harris can't reveal the address yet, but says it looks about 99% sure.

      We are happy to report that Barry Madore's radio-novela project is one of the finalists for several Knight Foundation grants to be awarded in October. Kathryn Harris is also in discussion with two cultural umbrella groups about an innovative idea for combining station underwriting with radio programming and fundraising for the member organizations.

      Volunteer positions are still open at the station, ranging from answering the phone and staffing the front desk to acting as a “traffic” engineer. If you want to contribute to the community in an innovative way, contact Station Manager Kathryn Harris at WEQYKathryn [at] gmail [dot] com.

      Related stories:

      © 2014 Dayton's Bluff Forum

      Making transit-oriented development great at Lake and Hiawatha

      Wed, 2014-10-22 15:15
      Sam Newberg

      There is room for improvement at the transit-oriented development proposed at Lake Street and Hiawatha Avenue. It has been a long time coming, but the latest version of the project (shown above) has Hennepin County acting as master developer, working with a private design and development team led by BKV Group. A Hennepin County service center will be the primary tenant of a mixed-use office/retail building on the 6-acre site, which will also include an approximate one acre public plaza that will be home to the Midtown Farmers Market, as well as around 500 housing units. The county has indicated a short timeline to get the county services building up and running, and I fear in their haste urban design and public realm issues won’t be properly vetted.

      This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Streets.MN. Check out the links below for other recent Streets.MN stories:

      I was part of the BKV Group design team that started working with the Corcoran Neighborhood Organization (CNO) in 2009 (five years ago!) to push forward on design ideas for the site. I’m no longer on the BKV team, but have been asked by CNO to weigh in on matters of design, particularly the public realm and plaza. So here goes.

      First, the public plaza is in the wrong location. Second, pedestrian connections around and through the site may be less than adequate. Third, it is critically important to pay close attention to how the ground floor of these buildings (commercial and residential) relate to the sidewalk and street. Hennepin County needs to put the brakes on this project to get the public realm and urban design right.

      Regarding the plaza, placing the county services building with ground floor retail frontage right on Lake Street is all well and good and follows basic urbanism principles. However, in this scenario I continue to question why the public plaza remains squished up against the rail viaduct. True, it will have good access to and from the station entrance, but it will be largely hidden from view from Lake Street and not visible at all from the adjacent YWCA. I think this is a huge mistake. Besides, it is always worth quoting Joe Riley, who says “great cities give their best edges over to the public realm.” So why is the supposed lynchpin of this site – a public plaza – not facing Lake Street? Doing so would allow all – train riders, bus riders, drivers and pedestrians on Lake Street, guests coming and going from the YWCA, and students of nearby South High School – to see and experience a high-quality public space in any season, whether the farmer’s market is operating or not (Eastern Market, below, is but one of many examples).

      Furthermore, the current plan places two retail spaces facing Lake Street, but also a community room. While the preliminary designs show lots of glass and transparency (a good thing), I’m not sure that only two retail spaces will be enough to activate the Lake Street side of this project. It also feels like the community room is just filler. A third retail space faces the plaza only, which I believe is a pretty major flaw and will be a very hard space to fill. My gut says if you can’t get it right, don’t do it at all. Placing the plaza right on Lake Street, with the county building and retail space set back and essentially facing both the plaza and street at the same time, could very well assuage this problem, as it gives both public space and retail full visibility and exposure. It would allow all retail space to face both street and plaza, making them more viable. The community room should be on the second floor, not taking up potentially valuable and active retail space.

      If we accept that the Hennepin County services building must be on Lake Street, then we must address the grade-level midblock passage proposed to cut through the block. In concept, this is a good idea. After all, adding streets to the grid is Jane Jacobs 101.

      Adding one street increases pedestrian choices by a significant factor, and breaks up megablocks. The problem is, the current plan calls for a midblock passage that not only passes under an unnecessary second story appendage of the Hennepin County building, but next to an at-grade parking lot covered by the private rooftop amenity deck for the proposed market rate apartments. The path crosses what appears to be the retail truck loading area as well. So yes, a pedestrian can choose to take this path, but why would anyone do so?

      The good urbanist in me would ask why not just take the sidewalk along Lake Street to reach a popular destination such as the YWCA? Well, one answer is they provide free parking so I just drive. I only mention the YWCA because close to 1,000 people per day pass through its doors, and the most active pedestrian door at the YWCA faces the parking lot (not Lake Street), as do a large bank of second story windows in the fitness area (eyes on the street/lot). And it is important when planning this site to acknowledge surrounding land uses that aren’t likely to change. Hoping everyone chooses to walk and use the Lake Street entrance is farfetched at best, is a case of hopeful planner thinking, and we’d all be better off if existing conditions and human nature were taken into account. Today one can see in a direct line from the light rail station entrance to the most used entrance of the Y, and vice-versa. Furthermore, a natural location for a stage, fountain or meeting place on the plaza is also in this line of sight. So why block that view with a parking lot, building appendage and private amenity space? The design team has proposed to shield the view of this parking/drive area with a bicycle storage facility, which seems like a good gesture but masks a fundamental design flaw. Regardless of where the plaza is, it is important that it be visible from both the transit station and the YWCA and that any midblock passage be dignified and humane.

      Here’s why I’m concerned. BKV is the architect of The Marshall in Dinkytown, where they recently designed a midblock passage, and this is what they came up with.

      While they did provide a means for pedestrians to pass through, the design is certainly lacking. This makes me bristle – an uninviting, potentially unsafe passageway with no vista nor visual attraction.

      The midblock passage can work, but let’s do it some justice and make it more dignified, more urban, more like a street, and less like an underpass next to a parking ramp. Let’s make it more like Warren Place in Brooklyn…

      …Tongli in Suzhou, China…

      …Zakkendragerssteeg in Utrecht, Netherlands…

      …or even Carrer dels Cecs de Sant Cugat in Barcelona (but straight so as not to block the views up and down the street).

      Lastly, I very much applaud that residential units will have ground floor walk-out entrances. However, even the details of this must be paid close attention. Front doors must be inviting and facing the street but not overly gated off or with steps that appear to be hanging off the building. Doing it right like Vancouver…


      …St. Mark’s Avenue in Brooklyn…


      …or our very own Lake Street in Minneapolis, is critical.

      A simple instinct is that we’ve been planning this project for so long, let’s just get it done! That would be a shame, as it risks winding up with a very average result. We’ve taken so long but still not gotten the plan right; it is even more important that we take the extra time needed now to do so. The plaza can be moved, and regardless, the public realm can be improved. (Of course the cruel irony in planning for a transit-oriented development is parking dictates so much of the design.)

      I encourage councilmember Alondra Cano to risk that this project may not host its ribbon cutting on her watch, and that she work with CPED staff and Hennepin County to get the public realm right. I encourage commissioner Peter McLaughlin to step back and put urban design ahead of a tight timeline of providing county services. I encourage city and county staff and CNO to focus first and foremost on the public realm. I encourage all readers to contact elected officials and demand better urban design that benefits all.

      Hennepin County wants this project done fast. We need to demand it be done right.

      Related stories:

      Streets.MN

      Dinkytown's new alliances

      Wed, 2014-10-22 14:41
      Southside Pride

      If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading. –Lao Tzu

      Ten months ago, Dinkytown was at one of those unmistakable crossroads of change rife with both crisis and opportunity. The businesses in Dinkytown are survivors of change, so this was nothing new, but this time, a perfect storm of factors came close together. On the plus side, the City of Minneapolis and Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association were taking much more notice of Dinkytown. But at the beginning of 2014, Skott Johnson, the longtime leader of the Dinkytown Business Association, known as DBA, closed his business at 1300 4th St. S.E., Autographics, and left the Twin Cities. The old Marshall High building, UTech, had been demolished and the House of Hanson would follow close on its heels. And local developer Kelly Doran was proposing to build a hotel on 4th Street, which would entail taking out yet more old low-rise buildings housing small shops and restaurants. It’s no exaggeration to say the future of Dinkytown’s identity was up for grabs.

      Despite being an off-and-on president, Skott Johnson was the full-time powerhouse behind the DBA. He was both effective and beloved; people still miss him and speak of him fondly. When he left, the organization began to flounder, mostly because Johnson held a lot of the institutional knowledge in his head. And, the other positions within the DBA were informal; the structure was loosely defined.

      When the DBA tried to regroup to fight the hotel plans and other battles, they found that their paperwork was not in order and their legitimacy as representatives of the businesses was open to question. Since a new organization had to be established anyway, it just made sense to start from scratch. So the DBA was dissolved and a new DBA, now named Dinkytown Business Alliance, was formed, with a new charter and an elected and committed board. The new DBA has a built-in relationship with the city and with Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association. And the new name points to its new direction—connecting and inclusive, rather than the closed and passive sounding “association.”

      Read more TC Daily Planet coverage of development in Dinkytown.

      An organizational development consultant was hired: Cara Letofsky, highly respected and with deep connections at City Hall and elsewhere. The City Council denied Doran’s permit to build the hotel. The development that went in mid-2014 on the old House of Hanson corner looks to be a success, as an upscale housing development also housing the first “boutique” Target Express, which provides some grocery shopping and some jobs for area students and residents. And by the early fall of 2014, the new DBA was off and running. Mike Mulrooney, owner of Blarney, was elected president. The organization, collaborating with neighborhood associations, won a Great Streets Grant from the city, with three development goals: 1) to grow the DBA organizationally (Letofsky’s main task as consultant); 2) to develop and implement a marketing plan for Dinkytown; and 3) recruitment and retention of businesses.

      Besides Mulrooney, the other officers or unofficial leaders and strong participants in the DBA (not an exhaustive list) include Randall Gast of Qdoba, Jason McLean of Loring Pasta Bar, Georgia, Jim and Antigone Sander of Kafe 421, Liz Johnson of Magus, Greg Pillsbury of Burrito Loco, and the one person I talked to the most, Kristen Eide-Tollefson of the Book House, now relocated on the second floor across the street from its former home in the House of Hanson. Kristen has long been active in Dinkytown and is the remaining original Book House owner out of two couples who started it in 1976. Her position on the DBA board currently is communications, editing the newsletter and other functions. She says that Dinkytown has always been a business incubator, a place where businesses start and try out new innovations. She points to the tiny Target as another example of that, even if it is backed by a big corporation. Another surprise—the trendy clothing shop Gina and Wills is actually a consignment shop run by Goodwill Industries.

      With the first of their three goals underway, the attention is now on the second—marketing. A request for proposal process recently closed and the DBA is soon to choose a marketing director to implement a chosen plan. Dinkytown’s identity is the issue, along with overcoming some perhaps false conceptions about the area. Several of those I talked to spoke of making Dinkytown a “destination” for people all over the Twin Cities and over many demographics. Dinkytown is not just a student neighborhood, nor just a nostalgia trip for old Bohemians. The Book House, for instance, is legendary in the book world, and definitely worth the trip. Another challenge to overcome is transportation; drivers assume there is no parking, but although some surface lots have been lost to development, there is actually a lot more parking than in other similar business districts. Dinkytown offers a mix of bars and coffee shops; Blarney is popular all over the city, especially on game days, and the venerable Espresso Royale hosts a satellite book shop from the Book House. Dinkytown offers interesting and sophisticated shopping venues, five churches, a library, and live music at the Varsity theatre. It has a huge array of dining options, from Shuang Cheng’s highly reputed Chinese fare, to quick Japanese at Sushi One Two Three, to traditional Italian-American at Vescio’s, to international fine dining at Kafe 421 and the Loring Pasta Bar. With so much going for it, Dinkytown looks to be finally gaining the respect it deserves.

      If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading. –Lao Tzu

      Ten months ago, Dinkytown was at one of those unmistakable crossroads of change rife with both crisis and opportunity. The businesses in Dinkytown are survivors of change, so this was nothing new, but this time, a perfect storm of factors came close together. On the plus side, the City of Minneapolis and Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association were taking much more notice of Dinkytown. But at the beginning of 2014, Skott Johnson, the longtime leader of the Dinkytown Business Association, known as DBA, closed his business at 1300 4th St. S.E., Autographics, and left the Twin Cities. The old Marshall High building, UTech, had been demolished and the House of Hanson would follow close on its heels. And local developer Kelly Doran was proposing to build a hotel on 4th Street, which would entail taking out yet more old low-rise buildings housing small shops and restaurants. It’s no exaggeration to say the future of Dinkytown’s identity was up for grabs.

      Despite being an off-and-on president, Skott Johnson was the full-time powerhouse behind the DBA. He was both effective and beloved; people still miss him and speak of him fondly. When he left, the organization began to flounder, mostly because Johnson held a lot of the institutional knowledge in his head. And, the other positions within the DBA were informal; the structure was loosely defined.

      When the DBA tried to regroup to fight the hotel plans and other battles, they found that their paperwork was not in order and their legitimacy as representatives of the businesses was open to question. Since a new organization had to be established anyway, it just made sense to start from scratch. So the DBA was dissolved and a new DBA, now named Dinkytown Business Alliance, was formed, with a new charter and an elected and committed board. The new DBA has a built-in relationship with the city and with Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association. And the new name points to its new direction—connecting and inclusive, rather than the closed and passive sounding “association.”

      Read more TC Daily Planet coverage of development in Dinkytown.

      An organizational development consultant was hired: Cara Letofsky, highly respected and with deep connections at City Hall and elsewhere. The City Council denied Doran’s permit to build the hotel. The development that went in mid-2014 on the old House of Hanson corner looks to be a success, as an upscale housing development also housing the first “boutique” Target Express, which provides some grocery shopping and some jobs for area students and residents. And by the early fall of 2014, the new DBA was off and running. Mike Mulrooney, owner of Blarney, was elected president. The organization, collaborating with neighborhood associations, won a Great Streets Grant from the city, with three development goals: 1) to grow the DBA organizationally (Letofsky’s main task as consultant); 2) to develop and implement a marketing plan for Dinkytown; and 3) recruitment and retention of businesses.

      Besides Mulrooney, the other officers or unofficial leaders and strong participants in the DBA (not an exhaustive list) include Randall Gast of Qdoba, Jason McLean of Loring Pasta Bar, Georgia, Jim and Antigone Sander of Kafe 421, Liz Johnson of Magus, Greg Pillsbury of Burrito Loco, and the one person I talked to the most, Kristen Eide-Tollefson of the Book House, now relocated on the second floor across the street from its former home in the House of Hanson. Kristen has long been active in Dinkytown and is the remaining original Book House owner out of two couples who started it in 1976. Her position on the DBA board currently is communications, editing the newsletter and other functions. She says that Dinkytown has always been a business incubator, a place where businesses start and try out new innovations. She points to the tiny Target as another example of that, even if it is backed by a big corporation. Another surprise—the trendy clothing shop Gina and Wills is actually a consignment shop run by Goodwill Industries.

      With the first of their three goals underway, the attention is now on the second—marketing. A request for proposal process recently closed and the DBA is soon to choose a marketing director to implement a chosen plan. Dinkytown’s identity is the issue, along with overcoming some perhaps false conceptions about the area. Several of those I talked to spoke of making Dinkytown a “destination” for people all over the Twin Cities and over many demographics. Dinkytown is not just a student neighborhood, nor just a nostalgia trip for old Bohemians. The Book House, for instance, is legendary in the book world, and definitely worth the trip. Another challenge to overcome is transportation; drivers assume there is no parking, but although some surface lots have been lost to development, there is actually a lot more parking than in other similar business districts. Dinkytown offers a mix of bars and coffee shops; Blarney is popular all over the city, especially on game days, and the venerable Espresso Royale hosts a satellite book shop from the Book House. Dinkytown offers interesting and sophisticated shopping venues, five churches, a library, and live music at the Varsity theatre. It has a huge array of dining options, from Shuang Cheng’s highly reputed Chinese fare, to quick Japanese at Sushi One Two Three, to traditional Italian-American at Vescio’s, to international fine dining at Kafe 421 and the Loring Pasta Bar. With so much going for it, Dinkytown looks to be finally gaining the respect it deserves.

      © 2014 Southside Pride

        Como Park bridge project underway

        Tue, 2014-10-21 15:58

        After several delays, work has begun on the footbridge project near the Historic Streetcar Station in Como Park.

        First, LS Black Constructors of Maplewood will clear vegetation from around the bridge and lay a bituminous bicycle trail that will follow the alignment of the old streetcar tracks.

        This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

        Then, either this fall or in the spring, bridge restoration work will get underway, with the bridge opened for pedestrian use next summer, according to Don Varney, City of St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department project manager.

        The footbridge, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, once formed a main entrance to Como Park but was neglected and became little more than a ruin over time.

        After several delays, work has begun on the footbridge project near the Historic Streetcar Station in Como Park.

        First, LS Black Constructors of Maplewood will clear vegetation from around the bridge and lay a bituminous bicycle trail that will follow the alignment of the old streetcar tracks.

        This article is reposted from TCDP media partner Park Bugle. Check out the links below for other recent Park Bugle stories:

        Then, either this fall or in the spring, bridge restoration work will get underway, with the bridge opened for pedestrian use next summer, according to Don Varney, City of St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department project manager.

        The footbridge, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, once formed a main entrance to Como Park but was neglected and became little more than a ruin over time.

        © 2014 Park Bugle

        Hope at the end of the Rainbow? Brainstorming for soon-to-be-vacant storefront begins

        Mon, 2014-10-20 16:25
        edfelien@souths... Southside Pride

        “When elephants fight, the grass suffers.” Swahili proverb

        The elephants have struggled. Rainbow and Cub fought for years over market share at Lake and Minnehaha, but they remained competitive, and each had their share of loyal customers. Then Target decided to open a fresh food section in their store, and that became too much. One elephant fell down. Rainbow lost the battle and is leaving the Twin Cities market, and South Minneapolis is left with an empty storefront.

        Building the store, clearing the land, paving the parking lot, finishing the interior to meet Health Department codes represent a tremendous capital investment. According to the city’s valuation the property is worth $1,365,000, and that’s probably low because they value the building at only $223,800. It would probably cost well over a million dollars to replace the current building.

        So, what’s going to happen to it? Will the building just be torn down and replaced by yet another high rise?

        Some of the neighbors have started to weigh in on the Longfellow List.

        Leslie MacKenzie said,

        “My husband had a great idea. How about a community commercial kitchen (since it’s already there)? And one of those businesses where you can go in and create a week’s worth of frozen meals (like Let’s Dish). It could have a twist that most of the ingredients are locally grown. (It could tie in with Community Table, a local organization that helps minority farmers find a way to sell or use excess produce.)

        HildaViktoria Mork said,

        “I’m with Leslie and her husband. Drop in/evening daycare is a great need. Nearest full service office supply store is in Nicollet. One closer to home would be appreciated. I would love to see a business in this community that supports crafters and home sewers, knitters, quilters—and offers classes, work-social groups, and maybe an exchange for surplus materials. A retailer that sells and repairs good (foot-healthy) shoes and has knowledgeable staff would be much appreciated. I think a drop-in commercial kitchen where one can obtain and prep nutritious meals would benefit many people—both working families prepping ahead as well as those who live without kitchen facilities. If there can be a tie-in with the Farmers’ Market, great—although I’m still hoping that the school site will work out for that.”

        I put my two cents in:

        “My idea for the Sears tower, when Mayor Belton and Council Member Brian Herron were trying to tear it down and do a strip mall, was a very under-capitalized common market. Rent out stalls to local businesses—like an indoor farmers’ market. The city should purchase the building and create an indoor municipal marketplace for small growers and local businesses.”

        Jennifer Schultz wants

        “An indoor public market similar to the Westside Market in Cleveland.”

        Sheldon Mains thought that was a

        “nice creative idea—could be relatively cheap to buy and refurbish into an indoor market—pull out the shelving and display coolers, tear down some interior partitions and the rents could be pretty low! (rent out the walk-in refrigerator and freezer spaces, if it still has the meat prep area and the bakery, rent those as daily use commercial kitchens (those may have been torn out sometime in the last 15 years).”

        These pipedreams suddenly became more possible when the city discovered that it was going to have a new pot of money dropping into its lap because the tax increment districts that had been funding neighborhood revitalization are now paying off better and faster than anyone thought they would. There could be at least $15 million more for the city over the next six years. That money was originally earmarked for neighborhood organizations, but Mayor Rybak and then-chair of the Ways and Means Committee, Betsy Hodges, decided to let the money go straight into the city treasury. That process of bankrupting the neighborhood organizations ended with the total elimination of the Neighborhood Revitalization Program.

        I have written about this for years. In October of 2012, writing about the Rybak-Hodges’ plan, I said, “Target Center is another drain on the taxpayer. The section of the mayor’s recommended budget that deals with the funding for the Target Center is the most convoluted and confusing description of how one fund dips into another fund that merges into a new fund, etc. But there are two statements about the Center that leap off the page: ‘Under the special legislation, tax increment from the new district could only be used to pay principal and interest on Target Center bonds or for “neighborhood revitalization purposes.” The Consolidated TIF District will generate approximately $5 million in annual net tax increment revenue in 2012 and 2013, all of which will be used for Target Center debt service.’

        “The total of $10 million could have been used for “neighborhood revitalization purposes” but instead is being used to renovate the home of Glen Taylor’s Timberwolves. According to the latest Forbes ranking, Glen Taylor is Number 242 on the list of the richest persons in America, with a net worth of $1.8 billion, and the Neighborhood Revitalization Program has been starved out of existence. Is that the best deal we could get with Glen Taylor? Is this the best investment in Minneapolis’ future?”

        Council Member Cam Gordon, whose ward includes the vacant Rainbow, has said he will discuss the appropriate use of the new funds in his Health, Environment and Community Engagement Committee.

        “When elephants fight, the grass suffers.” Swahili proverb

        The elephants have struggled. Rainbow and Cub fought for years over market share at Lake and Minnehaha, but they remained competitive, and each had their share of loyal customers. Then Target decided to open a fresh food section in their store, and that became too much. One elephant fell down. Rainbow lost the battle and is leaving the Twin Cities market, and South Minneapolis is left with an empty storefront.

        Building the store, clearing the land, paving the parking lot, finishing the interior to meet Health Department codes represent a tremendous capital investment. According to the city’s valuation the property is worth $1,365,000, and that’s probably low because they value the building at only $223,800. It would probably cost well over a million dollars to replace the current building.

        So, what’s going to happen to it? Will the building just be torn down and replaced by yet another high rise?

        Some of the neighbors have started to weigh in on the Longfellow List.

        Leslie MacKenzie said,

        “My husband had a great idea. How about a community commercial kitchen (since it’s already there)? And one of those businesses where you can go in and create a week’s worth of frozen meals (like Let’s Dish). It could have a twist that most of the ingredients are locally grown. (It could tie in with Community Table, a local organization that helps minority farmers find a way to sell or use excess produce.)

        HildaViktoria Mork said,

        “I’m with Leslie and her husband. Drop in/evening daycare is a great need. Nearest full service office supply store is in Nicollet. One closer to home would be appreciated. I would love to see a business in this community that supports crafters and home sewers, knitters, quilters—and offers classes, work-social groups, and maybe an exchange for surplus materials. A retailer that sells and repairs good (foot-healthy) shoes and has knowledgeable staff would be much appreciated. I think a drop-in commercial kitchen where one can obtain and prep nutritious meals would benefit many people—both working families prepping ahead as well as those who live without kitchen facilities. If there can be a tie-in with the Farmers’ Market, great—although I’m still hoping that the school site will work out for that.”

        I put my two cents in:

        “My idea for the Sears tower, when Mayor Belton and Council Member Brian Herron were trying to tear it down and do a strip mall, was a very under-capitalized common market. Rent out stalls to local businesses—like an indoor farmers’ market. The city should purchase the building and create an indoor municipal marketplace for small growers and local businesses.”

        Jennifer Schultz wants

        “An indoor public market similar to the Westside Market in Cleveland.”

        Sheldon Mains thought that was a

        “nice creative idea—could be relatively cheap to buy and refurbish into an indoor market—pull out the shelving and display coolers, tear down some interior partitions and the rents could be pretty low! (rent out the walk-in refrigerator and freezer spaces, if it still has the meat prep area and the bakery, rent those as daily use commercial kitchens (those may have been torn out sometime in the last 15 years).”

        These pipedreams suddenly became more possible when the city discovered that it was going to have a new pot of money dropping into its lap because the tax increment districts that had been funding neighborhood revitalization are now paying off better and faster than anyone thought they would. There could be at least $15 million more for the city over the next six years. That money was originally earmarked for neighborhood organizations, but Mayor Rybak and then-chair of the Ways and Means Committee, Betsy Hodges, decided to let the money go straight into the city treasury. That process of bankrupting the neighborhood organizations ended with the total elimination of the Neighborhood Revitalization Program.

        I have written about this for years. In October of 2012, writing about the Rybak-Hodges’ plan, I said, “Target Center is another drain on the taxpayer. The section of the mayor’s recommended budget that deals with the funding for the Target Center is the most convoluted and confusing description of how one fund dips into another fund that merges into a new fund, etc. But there are two statements about the Center that leap off the page: ‘Under the special legislation, tax increment from the new district could only be used to pay principal and interest on Target Center bonds or for “neighborhood revitalization purposes.” The Consolidated TIF District will generate approximately $5 million in annual net tax increment revenue in 2012 and 2013, all of which will be used for Target Center debt service.’

        “The total of $10 million could have been used for “neighborhood revitalization purposes” but instead is being used to renovate the home of Glen Taylor’s Timberwolves. According to the latest Forbes ranking, Glen Taylor is Number 242 on the list of the richest persons in America, with a net worth of $1.8 billion, and the Neighborhood Revitalization Program has been starved out of existence. Is that the best deal we could get with Glen Taylor? Is this the best investment in Minneapolis’ future?”

        Council Member Cam Gordon, whose ward includes the vacant Rainbow, has said he will discuss the appropriate use of the new funds in his Health, Environment and Community Engagement Committee.

        © 2014 Southside Pride

          Phillips community sweeps up the neighborhood

          Sun, 2014-10-19 12:45
          jakre Community Voices

          The four Phillips Neighborhoods of Minneapolis, Phillips East, West, Midtown and Ventura Village, collaborated once again onr the annual Phillips Clean Sweep on October 11. Neighbors grabbed garbage bags and picker-uppers to pick up trash on the streets and others joined city garbage crews to pick up large items in the alleys.

          This is a Community Voices submission and is moderated but not edited. The opinions expressed by Community Voices contributors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the TC Daily Planet.

          Community volunteers gathered at two sites in the morning for breakfast and then after the cleanup, met again at Stewart Park for lunch and a celebration. Hundreds of residents and dozens of organizations partnered to make the event a success. Here's a look:


          The four Phillips Neighborhoods of Minneapolis, Phillips East, West, Midtown and Ventura Village, collaborated once again onr the annual Phillips Clean Sweep on October 11. Neighbors grabbed garbage bags and picker-uppers to pick up trash on the streets and others joined city garbage crews to pick up large items in the alleys.

          This is a Community Voices submission and is moderated but not edited. The opinions expressed by Community Voices contributors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the TC Daily Planet.

          Community volunteers gathered at two sites in the morning for breakfast and then after the cleanup, met again at Stewart Park for lunch and a celebration. Hundreds of residents and dozens of organizations partnered to make the event a success. Here's a look:


          © 2014 John Akre

          A new era for Dogtown, as store changes hands

          Sat, 2014-10-18 19:08
          Gail Olson Northeaster

          Back in the days when corner grocery stores abounded, Beltrami Neighborhood residents had many choices, including Delmonico’s, Maple Leaf, Spano’s, Rusciano’s, and Schullo’s.

          Through the years, most of the small stores disappeared. Last month one of the oldest family-owned groceries, Delmonico’s Italian Foods, 1112 Summer St. NE, changed hands, when co-owners and cousins Terry Delmonico and Bob Delmonico decided to sell the store and let Terry retire.

          Founded in 1919 by Vincenzo and Anna Delmonico, the store was well-known for its homemade Italian sausage, fried peppers, calzones, and pizzelles. Even though the store is not closing, some residents nonetheless say they see it as the end of an era, in a beloved Northeast neighborhood once known as Little Italy.

          Maple Hill history

          Early Maple Hill residents included many Italian immigrants who settled there in the 1920s and 1930s. Later renamed the Beltrami Neighborhood after Italian explorer Giacomo Constantino Beltrami, its borders are Broadway to the north, Central Avenue to the west, Spring Street to the south and Johnson Street to the east.

          The Maple Hill name came from an 1857 private cemetery owned by the Dudley P. Chase Grand Army of the Republic Post. It was the burial site for many Civil War veterans. The struggle to convert the cemetery land to parkland began when the Minneapolis City Council condemned some of the cemetery’s land, in order to open Fillmore and Polk streets between Summer and Broadway. In 1894, workers moved more than 1,000 bodies from Maple Hill to Sunset and Hillside cemeteries. Authorities later suspected Maple Hill Improvement League members—who wanted all of the land for a park—of vandalizing the cemetery and destroying many tombstones. Eventually, the city converted the land to a park.

          Minneapolitans of Italian Descent presented the Beltrami monument to the City in 1947; it still stands at the north end of Beltrami Park, as does another monument commemorating the cemetery.

          Left: The plaque showing Beltrami’s namesake

          House, church, park, and school

          Some who grew up in Beltrami cite four things unique to the neighborhood of their youth: Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church, Beltrami Park, Franklin Pierce Elementary School, and the Margaret Barry Settlement House.

          The church and park are still there, but Pierce School at 1121 Broadway St. NE was razed. The Margaret Barry House, a huge vine-covered building that is still standing at 739 Pierce St. NE, is now privately owned.

          Former Northeast resident and Edison graduate Bob Peters lived in the 600 block of Pierce Street in the 1940s and 1950s. “It was a neighborhood where we felt safe,” he said. “There were no predators. My mother would say, ‘Be home before dark,’ and I’d be gone, out with my friends, all day. Everybody had front porches and everybody knew everybody else. I knew that if I misbehaved, Mrs. Carlucci down the street would call my mother.”

          He said that there were many kids in the area. Most of them attended elementary school at Pierce, junior high at Sheridan or Marshall, and high school at Edison, Marshall, or Vocational.

          Everybody hung out at the Margaret Barry House, also known as the Bughouse. “You could play football, basketball, and baseball there. It was a place for us to go to stay out of trouble. There were always counselors there; most of them were young men from the neighborhood.”

          Sometimes the “staying out of trouble” plan didn’t work so well, Peters admitted. “We used to terrorize the neighborhood. Everybody had big gardens and grew a lot of tomatoes, and we’d throw them at houses and cars on Broadway. Then we’d run like hell.”

          Another Northeaster, Ed Matthes (right), said he spent a lot of his youth in the 1960s with his grandmother, Mary Marino, at her house across the street from Beltrami Park. (Matthes owned the Marino’s Restaurant on Central Avenue NE until 2004, and now operates Marino’s, which does catering, in Fridley. His brother Ralph owns Marino’s Deli on Johnson Street NE.)

          Ed Matthes said that the Barry House, the Catholic church, and the park were neighborhood anchors. “Margaret Barry had activities going on all the time. They had many events for kids. We’d play board games and bumper pool. When it was time to get our vaccinations, that’s where we’d go. They had a basketball court. Sometimes they had parties. I remember winning an Instamatic camera in 1965.”

          Beltrami Park’s warming house on the west side of the field was their “winter social meeting place,” he said. “They had a big open rink for ice skating but not hockey. We’d go skating there and play hockey at Logan Park.”

          Matthes said he was an altar boy at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. “Father Malley, who was Irish, was a hard-nosed priest. He was a surrogate father for a lot of kids in that neighborhood. He was pretty active, and walked around the neighborhood all the time.

          You could be at confession and he’d respond to you by name, which was kind of funny, since confession is supposed to be anonymous. We knew we’d better not do whatever we’d done ever again, or he would tell our parents.”

          Matthes added, “There were elements in that neighborhood that could draw you into criminal activity. We had 10- and 12-year old kids playing craps on the tennis courts.” He said he had fun chasing bats out of the boxcars on the nearby railroad tracks, before the railroad closed off the access to them. “We weren’t worried about getting hit by trains, but we were worried about being chased by the train dicks.”

          He too felt safe in the neighborhood. “We had adults who watched over their own and dealt with any problems. The only thing we kids had to fear was from our own mischief. We were blowing off fireworks. We’d take blasting caps from the tracks and drop bricks on them.”

          When asked about Beltrami’s nickname of “Dogtown,” Matthes said that there were many dogs in the neighborhood. (Some people have speculated that the term was less benign and a sign of the times, with “dog” referring to Dago, a derogatory slang word for Italians.)

          Matthes recalled an actual neighborhood-owned dog, a big boxer named Penny. “She’d go from house to house and everybody took care of her. We all knew her, but nobody knew who owned her. She hung around the park. We’d play Capture the Flag, and she’d be there. She took up with anybody who wanted to take up with her. Some days she’d be sleeping in the street in the sun.”

          Columbia Heights resident Eric Harmel said he moved to the Beltrami area with his mother in 1944 and started fifth grade at Pierce School. He has fond memories of the settlement house, the church, and the neighbors’ wonderful Italian food. “It was a good neighborhood. People were very close. I spent a lot of time at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, even though I wasn’t a member. All those people looked after me when I came in. There were times during World War II when my mother and I didn’t have a thing to eat. One of the ladies invited us over for Sunday dinner, which in that area always meant a big spaghetti dinner.

          Harmel said he did what he could to earn spending money. “I sold papers from the time I was a young kid until I got out of high school. On Friday nights when I’d go to collect, people offered me food. There was always a wine bottle on the table.”

          Harmel said he liked the Margaret Barry House’s mission. “All those settlement houses that they had around the Twin Cities were very important things for kids. It was a place for us to all go and meet and do things. It provided recreation…sports, even cooking classes. It was a drop-in center for us. I have no idea what kids today are doing, or where they go.”

          Our Lady of Mt. Carmel

          According to its history records, the parish started in Northeast in the early 1900s. It bought its present building at 701 Fillmore St. NE in 1938. At the time, the building was 30 years old; it had been a protestant church, built by the United Brethren. In 2005, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel celebrated its 67th anniversary with a parish festival that included releasing a flock of white doves, two masses by Bishop Richard Pates, a procession around the block, dedication of the building’s new elevator, and a spaghetti dinner attended by 600. The day included some excitement. The Sept. 29, 2005, Northeaster quoted long-time parishioner Mary Cotroneo as saying, “The elevator stopped working after it was dedicated, and a lady fainted after the procession. We had two ambulances and a fire truck here. But then she was okay and went down and ate her spaghetti.”

          Our Lady of Mt. Carmel was founded by Italians. Through the years many parishioners were well-known in Northeast, including restaurateur and Italian food entrepreneur Rose Totino; Italian food entrepreneur Mama D (Giovanna D’Agostino) George and Louis Delmonico, former Delmonico’s owners; and Dr. Joseph Spano, a popular family physician.

          Church rules were strict in its early days. A Polish lady who had been married in the church, attended every Sunday and served as its cantor was not allowed to join for many years, because she was not Italian.

          The parish and the Beltrami neighborhood suffered a blow in the 1960s, when the state planned to build freeway 35W through its center. Crews destroyed or moved many houses, before planners decided to route the freeway two blocks farther east. The change came late for the parish, however, which lost about half its families, from 400 down to about 200.

          “When 35W went through that neighborhood,” Harmel said, “it destroyed one of the most charming neighborhoods in Minneapolis.”

          Delmonico’s farewell

          Thomas Plantz, Vincenzo Delmonico’s grandson, recently wrote a store and family history, noting that Delmonico’s was the first grocery store in Minneapolis to take customer orders by phone and deliver groceries to homes.

          The store opened during the Great Depression, and many customers could barely pay for their groceries. Delmonico’s extended them credit. “Some of those credits are still on the books 85 years later,” Plantz wrote.

          Vincenzo and Anna passed the business to their seven children: Mike, Minnie, Don, Louis, Bill, George, and Mary. Terry and Bob, third generation owners, are Louie and George’s sons. All learned the business “at their fathers’ knees,” according to Plantz. “The little store really never grew in size, but it overflowed with Italian love and a deep passion to serve the community.”

          He noted that Delmonico’s was for many years the wholesaler of choice for Mnneapolis Italian restaurants. Friends and customers included Café Di Napoli, Venice Café, Luigi’s, Mama D’s, Caffe Biaggio, and Donatelle’s.

          New owner Jessica Rivera is renaming the store “Jessi’s Market at Delmonicos” and according to Plantz plans to carry on some of the traditions and the legacy, as well as adding her personal touch.

          Follow her story on the Facebook page (Jessi’s Market at Delmonico’s). One of the posts is a note from Bob and Terry saying “our wives have always said it would take a good woman… Turns out they were probably right all this time.”

          Plantz concludes his story by writing, “It’s the end of an era and the beginning of another! Ciao!”

          Back in the days when corner grocery stores abounded, Beltrami Neighborhood residents had many choices, including Delmonico’s, Maple Leaf, Spano’s, Rusciano’s, and Schullo’s.

          Through the years, most of the small stores disappeared. Last month one of the oldest family-owned groceries, Delmonico’s Italian Foods, 1112 Summer St. NE, changed hands, when co-owners and cousins Terry Delmonico and Bob Delmonico decided to sell the store and let Terry retire.

          Founded in 1919 by Vincenzo and Anna Delmonico, the store was well-known for its homemade Italian sausage, fried peppers, calzones, and pizzelles. Even though the store is not closing, some residents nonetheless say they see it as the end of an era, in a beloved Northeast neighborhood once known as Little Italy.

          Maple Hill history

          Early Maple Hill residents included many Italian immigrants who settled there in the 1920s and 1930s. Later renamed the Beltrami Neighborhood after Italian explorer Giacomo Constantino Beltrami, its borders are Broadway to the north, Central Avenue to the west, Spring Street to the south and Johnson Street to the east.

          The Maple Hill name came from an 1857 private cemetery owned by the Dudley P. Chase Grand Army of the Republic Post. It was the burial site for many Civil War veterans. The struggle to convert the cemetery land to parkland began when the Minneapolis City Council condemned some of the cemetery’s land, in order to open Fillmore and Polk streets between Summer and Broadway. In 1894, workers moved more than 1,000 bodies from Maple Hill to Sunset and Hillside cemeteries. Authorities later suspected Maple Hill Improvement League members—who wanted all of the land for a park—of vandalizing the cemetery and destroying many tombstones. Eventually, the city converted the land to a park.

          Minneapolitans of Italian Descent presented the Beltrami monument to the City in 1947; it still stands at the north end of Beltrami Park, as does another monument commemorating the cemetery.

          Left: The plaque showing Beltrami’s namesake

          House, church, park, and school

          Some who grew up in Beltrami cite four things unique to the neighborhood of their youth: Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church, Beltrami Park, Franklin Pierce Elementary School, and the Margaret Barry Settlement House.

          The church and park are still there, but Pierce School at 1121 Broadway St. NE was razed. The Margaret Barry House, a huge vine-covered building that is still standing at 739 Pierce St. NE, is now privately owned.

          Former Northeast resident and Edison graduate Bob Peters lived in the 600 block of Pierce Street in the 1940s and 1950s. “It was a neighborhood where we felt safe,” he said. “There were no predators. My mother would say, ‘Be home before dark,’ and I’d be gone, out with my friends, all day. Everybody had front porches and everybody knew everybody else. I knew that if I misbehaved, Mrs. Carlucci down the street would call my mother.”

          He said that there were many kids in the area. Most of them attended elementary school at Pierce, junior high at Sheridan or Marshall, and high school at Edison, Marshall, or Vocational.

          Everybody hung out at the Margaret Barry House, also known as the Bughouse. “You could play football, basketball, and baseball there. It was a place for us to go to stay out of trouble. There were always counselors there; most of them were young men from the neighborhood.”

          Sometimes the “staying out of trouble” plan didn’t work so well, Peters admitted. “We used to terrorize the neighborhood. Everybody had big gardens and grew a lot of tomatoes, and we’d throw them at houses and cars on Broadway. Then we’d run like hell.”

          Another Northeaster, Ed Matthes (right), said he spent a lot of his youth in the 1960s with his grandmother, Mary Marino, at her house across the street from Beltrami Park. (Matthes owned the Marino’s Restaurant on Central Avenue NE until 2004, and now operates Marino’s, which does catering, in Fridley. His brother Ralph owns Marino’s Deli on Johnson Street NE.)

          Ed Matthes said that the Barry House, the Catholic church, and the park were neighborhood anchors. “Margaret Barry had activities going on all the time. They had many events for kids. We’d play board games and bumper pool. When it was time to get our vaccinations, that’s where we’d go. They had a basketball court. Sometimes they had parties. I remember winning an Instamatic camera in 1965.”

          Beltrami Park’s warming house on the west side of the field was their “winter social meeting place,” he said. “They had a big open rink for ice skating but not hockey. We’d go skating there and play hockey at Logan Park.”

          Matthes said he was an altar boy at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. “Father Malley, who was Irish, was a hard-nosed priest. He was a surrogate father for a lot of kids in that neighborhood. He was pretty active, and walked around the neighborhood all the time.

          You could be at confession and he’d respond to you by name, which was kind of funny, since confession is supposed to be anonymous. We knew we’d better not do whatever we’d done ever again, or he would tell our parents.”

          Matthes added, “There were elements in that neighborhood that could draw you into criminal activity. We had 10- and 12-year old kids playing craps on the tennis courts.” He said he had fun chasing bats out of the boxcars on the nearby railroad tracks, before the railroad closed off the access to them. “We weren’t worried about getting hit by trains, but we were worried about being chased by the train dicks.”

          He too felt safe in the neighborhood. “We had adults who watched over their own and dealt with any problems. The only thing we kids had to fear was from our own mischief. We were blowing off fireworks. We’d take blasting caps from the tracks and drop bricks on them.”

          When asked about Beltrami’s nickname of “Dogtown,” Matthes said that there were many dogs in the neighborhood. (Some people have speculated that the term was less benign and a sign of the times, with “dog” referring to Dago, a derogatory slang word for Italians.)

          Matthes recalled an actual neighborhood-owned dog, a big boxer named Penny. “She’d go from house to house and everybody took care of her. We all knew her, but nobody knew who owned her. She hung around the park. We’d play Capture the Flag, and she’d be there. She took up with anybody who wanted to take up with her. Some days she’d be sleeping in the street in the sun.”

          Columbia Heights resident Eric Harmel said he moved to the Beltrami area with his mother in 1944 and started fifth grade at Pierce School. He has fond memories of the settlement house, the church, and the neighbors’ wonderful Italian food. “It was a good neighborhood. People were very close. I spent a lot of time at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, even though I wasn’t a member. All those people looked after me when I came in. There were times during World War II when my mother and I didn’t have a thing to eat. One of the ladies invited us over for Sunday dinner, which in that area always meant a big spaghetti dinner.

          Harmel said he did what he could to earn spending money. “I sold papers from the time I was a young kid until I got out of high school. On Friday nights when I’d go to collect, people offered me food. There was always a wine bottle on the table.”

          Harmel said he liked the Margaret Barry House’s mission. “All those settlement houses that they had around the Twin Cities were very important things for kids. It was a place for us to all go and meet and do things. It provided recreation…sports, even cooking classes. It was a drop-in center for us. I have no idea what kids today are doing, or where they go.”

          Our Lady of Mt. Carmel

          According to its history records, the parish started in Northeast in the early 1900s. It bought its present building at 701 Fillmore St. NE in 1938. At the time, the building was 30 years old; it had been a protestant church, built by the United Brethren. In 2005, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel celebrated its 67th anniversary with a parish festival that included releasing a flock of white doves, two masses by Bishop Richard Pates, a procession around the block, dedication of the building’s new elevator, and a spaghetti dinner attended by 600. The day included some excitement. The Sept. 29, 2005, Northeaster quoted long-time parishioner Mary Cotroneo as saying, “The elevator stopped working after it was dedicated, and a lady fainted after the procession. We had two ambulances and a fire truck here. But then she was okay and went down and ate her spaghetti.”

          Our Lady of Mt. Carmel was founded by Italians. Through the years many parishioners were well-known in Northeast, including restaurateur and Italian food entrepreneur Rose Totino; Italian food entrepreneur Mama D (Giovanna D’Agostino) George and Louis Delmonico, former Delmonico’s owners; and Dr. Joseph Spano, a popular family physician.

          Church rules were strict in its early days. A Polish lady who had been married in the church, attended every Sunday and served as its cantor was not allowed to join for many years, because she was not Italian.

          The parish and the Beltrami neighborhood suffered a blow in the 1960s, when the state planned to build freeway 35W through its center. Crews destroyed or moved many houses, before planners decided to route the freeway two blocks farther east. The change came late for the parish, however, which lost about half its families, from 400 down to about 200.

          “When 35W went through that neighborhood,” Harmel said, “it destroyed one of the most charming neighborhoods in Minneapolis.”

          Delmonico’s farewell

          Thomas Plantz, Vincenzo Delmonico’s grandson, recently wrote a store and family history, noting that Delmonico’s was the first grocery store in Minneapolis to take customer orders by phone and deliver groceries to homes.

          The store opened during the Great Depression, and many customers could barely pay for their groceries. Delmonico’s extended them credit. “Some of those credits are still on the books 85 years later,” Plantz wrote.

          Vincenzo and Anna passed the business to their seven children: Mike, Minnie, Don, Louis, Bill, George, and Mary. Terry and Bob, third generation owners, are Louie and George’s sons. All learned the business “at their fathers’ knees,” according to Plantz. “The little store really never grew in size, but it overflowed with Italian love and a deep passion to serve the community.”

          He noted that Delmonico’s was for many years the wholesaler of choice for Mnneapolis Italian restaurants. Friends and customers included Café Di Napoli, Venice Café, Luigi’s, Mama D’s, Caffe Biaggio, and Donatelle’s.

          New owner Jessica Rivera is renaming the store “Jessi’s Market at Delmonicos” and according to Plantz plans to carry on some of the traditions and the legacy, as well as adding her personal touch.

          Follow her story on the Facebook page (Jessi’s Market at Delmonico’s). One of the posts is a note from Bob and Terry saying “our wives have always said it would take a good woman… Turns out they were probably right all this time.”

          Plantz concludes his story by writing, “It’s the end of an era and the beginning of another! Ciao!”

          © 2014 Northeaster

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