Twin City Daily Planet Neighborhood News

Subscribe to Twin City Daily Planet Neighborhood News feed
Updated: 3 hours 8 min ago

Potholes and paving projects in Nokomis

Mon, 2014-04-14 15:05
edfelien@souths... Southside Pride

According to Mike Kennedy, the city’s director of the Transportation Maintenance and Repair Division, residents in the southwest and Lake Nokomis areas of the city call in with more complaints than anywhere else. But, the StarTribune reported, “He doesn’t believe their streets have more potholes than other parts of the city.”

Even if a city crew gets to the pothole and patches it, the constant freezing and thawing can disrupt the patch and the hole comes back uglier and more dangerous than ever.

Residents might suspect that a reason potholes are not being fixed as quickly around Lake Nokomis is because the Edgewater/Cedar Residential Resurfacing project is due to start there this summer, and it doesn’t seem to make much sense for city crews to keep patching a street that you’re going to have to tear up and repave in a couple of months. But Chris Trembath, the person responsible for the resurfacing project in the Public Works Department, says that’s not the case. “There are additional crews out working on potholes, and the potholes have nothing to do with the paving project,” he stated.

According to the city, “This is a paving resurfacing project. Resurfacing projects use a mill and overlay process. This process will consist of removing a portion of the existing asphalt pavement surface and placing a new surface over the entire street. The purpose of the resurfacing program is to extend the life of a roadway by approximately 10 years. Without this program, streets in the program would not see surface improvements for many years. Edgewater was originally paved in 1978. Cedar Avenue South was originally paved in 1962.”

As the map shows, “The Edgewater Residential Project is bounded by 54th Street East on the north, Edgewater Avenue North on the east, 58th Street East on the south, and 12th Avenue South on the west.”

It’s not clear when the work will begin or when it will end. There are two seasons in Minnesota: winter and construction, and no one knows for sure when the first season will end so the second season can begin.

Trembath says, “Depending on the weather, we expect to start the resurfacing in August, but that may change. There is utility work that has to go ahead of that, mostly cleaning and relining the water mains. If it starts in August, then the entire project should be done in one to three weeks. It only takes two days to resurface a street: one day to mill down the existing surface and another to repave.”

For more information, call Council Member John Quincy at 612-673-2211.

According to Mike Kennedy, the city’s director of the Transportation Maintenance and Repair Division, residents in the southwest and Lake Nokomis areas of the city call in with more complaints than anywhere else. But, the StarTribune reported, “He doesn’t believe their streets have more potholes than other parts of the city.”

Even if a city crew gets to the pothole and patches it, the constant freezing and thawing can disrupt the patch and the hole comes back uglier and more dangerous than ever.

Residents might suspect that a reason potholes are not being fixed as quickly around Lake Nokomis is because the Edgewater/Cedar Residential Resurfacing project is due to start there this summer, and it doesn’t seem to make much sense for city crews to keep patching a street that you’re going to have to tear up and repave in a couple of months. But Chris Trembath, the person responsible for the resurfacing project in the Public Works Department, says that’s not the case. “There are additional crews out working on potholes, and the potholes have nothing to do with the paving project,” he stated.

According to the city, “This is a paving resurfacing project. Resurfacing projects use a mill and overlay process. This process will consist of removing a portion of the existing asphalt pavement surface and placing a new surface over the entire street. The purpose of the resurfacing program is to extend the life of a roadway by approximately 10 years. Without this program, streets in the program would not see surface improvements for many years. Edgewater was originally paved in 1978. Cedar Avenue South was originally paved in 1962.”

As the map shows, “The Edgewater Residential Project is bounded by 54th Street East on the north, Edgewater Avenue North on the east, 58th Street East on the south, and 12th Avenue South on the west.”

It’s not clear when the work will begin or when it will end. There are two seasons in Minnesota: winter and construction, and no one knows for sure when the first season will end so the second season can begin.

Trembath says, “Depending on the weather, we expect to start the resurfacing in August, but that may change. There is utility work that has to go ahead of that, mostly cleaning and relining the water mains. If it starts in August, then the entire project should be done in one to three weeks. It only takes two days to resurface a street: one day to mill down the existing surface and another to repave.”

For more information, call Council Member John Quincy at 612-673-2211.

© 2014 Southside Pride

    Drop-off organics recycling arrives in Hale, Page and Diamond Lake

    Mon, 2014-04-14 14:54
    Southside Pride

    Attention Hale, Page and Diamond Lake residents:

    Recycle organics beginning on Earth Day, Saturday, April 26, from 9:30 to noon at Pearl Park. Bring all your compostables like fruit and veggie scraps, meat and dairy, and paper products like napkins, pizza boxes and much more. Volunteer monitors will be on hand to answer your questions and help ensure the first couple months of the program are a success. After that initial period, the program will be accessible 24/7. A short training is required to participate, and will be offered during the event. Initially, the Pearl Park drop-site will have specific drop-off hours.

    The program is a direct result of the community meeting on Dec. 4 at Fuller Recreation Center when the Tangletown and the Hale, Page, Diamond Lake neighborhoods worked with the City of Minneapolis to set up the local drop-site at Pearl Park.

    Nokomis East’s 2014 Annual Neighborhood Meeting will be Tuesday, April 22, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Crosstown Covenant Church (Corner of 29th Avenue and East 56th Street).

    For 2014, NENA’s Board of Directors has changed the meeting format: Dinner will not be offered. Instead, light refreshments will be served.

    After introductions and a brief report to the neighborhood, the board will hold elections for the Board of Directors neighborhood representatives. Four neighborhood representative positions on the NENA Board of Directors are up for election this year (one each for the Morris Park, Keewaydin, Wenonah and Minnehaha neighborhoods). All candidates must either live in the neighborhood, own property or a business, or work in the neighborhood. Please call the NENA office at 612-724-5652 for additional information on the duties and expectations of board members. The board meets monthly, usually on the fourth Thursday. Members serve two-year terms.

    After the elections there will be volunteer recognition and the presentation of The Best of Nokomis, the “Noki,” award.

    Attention Hale, Page and Diamond Lake residents:

    Recycle organics beginning on Earth Day, Saturday, April 26, from 9:30 to noon at Pearl Park. Bring all your compostables like fruit and veggie scraps, meat and dairy, and paper products like napkins, pizza boxes and much more. Volunteer monitors will be on hand to answer your questions and help ensure the first couple months of the program are a success. After that initial period, the program will be accessible 24/7. A short training is required to participate, and will be offered during the event. Initially, the Pearl Park drop-site will have specific drop-off hours.

    The program is a direct result of the community meeting on Dec. 4 at Fuller Recreation Center when the Tangletown and the Hale, Page, Diamond Lake neighborhoods worked with the City of Minneapolis to set up the local drop-site at Pearl Park.

    Nokomis East’s 2014 Annual Neighborhood Meeting will be Tuesday, April 22, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Crosstown Covenant Church (Corner of 29th Avenue and East 56th Street).

    For 2014, NENA’s Board of Directors has changed the meeting format: Dinner will not be offered. Instead, light refreshments will be served.

    After introductions and a brief report to the neighborhood, the board will hold elections for the Board of Directors neighborhood representatives. Four neighborhood representative positions on the NENA Board of Directors are up for election this year (one each for the Morris Park, Keewaydin, Wenonah and Minnehaha neighborhoods). All candidates must either live in the neighborhood, own property or a business, or work in the neighborhood. Please call the NENA office at 612-724-5652 for additional information on the duties and expectations of board members. The board meets monthly, usually on the fourth Thursday. Members serve two-year terms.

    After the elections there will be volunteer recognition and the presentation of The Best of Nokomis, the “Noki,” award.

    © 2014 Southside Pride

      Drop-off organics recycling arrives in Hale, Page and Diamond Lake

      Mon, 2014-04-14 14:54
      Southside Pride

      Attention Hale, Page and Diamond Lake residents:

      Recycle organics beginning on Earth Day, Saturday, April 26, from 9:30 to noon at Pearl Park. Bring all your compostables like fruit and veggie scraps, meat and dairy, and paper products like napkins, pizza boxes and much more. Volunteer monitors will be on hand to answer your questions and help ensure the first couple months of the program are a success. After that initial period, the program will be accessible 24/7. A short training is required to participate, and will be offered during the event. Initially, the Pearl Park drop-site will have specific drop-off hours.

      The program is a direct result of the community meeting on Dec. 4 at Fuller Recreation Center when the Tangletown and the Hale, Page, Diamond Lake neighborhoods worked with the City of Minneapolis to set up the local drop-site at Pearl Park.

      Nokomis East’s 2014 Annual Neighborhood Meeting will be Tuesday, April 22, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Crosstown Covenant Church (Corner of 29th Avenue and East 56th Street).

      For 2014, NENA’s Board of Directors has changed the meeting format: Dinner will not be offered. Instead, light refreshments will be served.

      After introductions and a brief report to the neighborhood, the board will hold elections for the Board of Directors neighborhood representatives. Four neighborhood representative positions on the NENA Board of Directors are up for election this year (one each for the Morris Park, Keewaydin, Wenonah and Minnehaha neighborhoods). All candidates must either live in the neighborhood, own property or a business, or work in the neighborhood. Please call the NENA office at 612-724-5652 for additional information on the duties and expectations of board members. The board meets monthly, usually on the fourth Thursday. Members serve two-year terms.

      After the elections there will be volunteer recognition and the presentation of The Best of Nokomis, the “Noki,” award.

      Attention Hale, Page and Diamond Lake residents:

      Recycle organics beginning on Earth Day, Saturday, April 26, from 9:30 to noon at Pearl Park. Bring all your compostables like fruit and veggie scraps, meat and dairy, and paper products like napkins, pizza boxes and much more. Volunteer monitors will be on hand to answer your questions and help ensure the first couple months of the program are a success. After that initial period, the program will be accessible 24/7. A short training is required to participate, and will be offered during the event. Initially, the Pearl Park drop-site will have specific drop-off hours.

      The program is a direct result of the community meeting on Dec. 4 at Fuller Recreation Center when the Tangletown and the Hale, Page, Diamond Lake neighborhoods worked with the City of Minneapolis to set up the local drop-site at Pearl Park.

      Nokomis East’s 2014 Annual Neighborhood Meeting will be Tuesday, April 22, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Crosstown Covenant Church (Corner of 29th Avenue and East 56th Street).

      For 2014, NENA’s Board of Directors has changed the meeting format: Dinner will not be offered. Instead, light refreshments will be served.

      After introductions and a brief report to the neighborhood, the board will hold elections for the Board of Directors neighborhood representatives. Four neighborhood representative positions on the NENA Board of Directors are up for election this year (one each for the Morris Park, Keewaydin, Wenonah and Minnehaha neighborhoods). All candidates must either live in the neighborhood, own property or a business, or work in the neighborhood. Please call the NENA office at 612-724-5652 for additional information on the duties and expectations of board members. The board meets monthly, usually on the fourth Thursday. Members serve two-year terms.

      After the elections there will be volunteer recognition and the presentation of The Best of Nokomis, the “Noki,” award.

      © 2014 Southside Pride

        Public meeting on plan to develop Miodtown Farmers Market Site

        Mon, 2014-04-14 14:50
        Corcoran News

        Hennepin County will propose a plan to redevelop the 6.4 acre property at 2225 East Lake Street, currently owned by Minneapolis Public Schools. The multi-phased plan would include a Family Service Center along with new offices, retail, housing, parking, and space for the Midtown Farmers Market. View detail image here.

        You are invited to a public hearing on April 3 at 6:00pm at 2225 East Lake Street. Weigh in and get involved in shaping the plan including retail offerings, sustainability and urban agriculture, bike/walk connections, plaza design, and more. This is the April meeting of Corcoran Neighborhood Organization’s Land Use & Housing committee. The CNO Board will decide whether to support the plan based on input at the April 3 meeting.

        Childcare, translation for Spanish speakers, and light refreshments will be provided at the meeting.

        Invite your neighbors and friends to also attend by inviting them on facebook.

        Questions? Contact Eric at eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org or 612-724-7457.

        Read more about development on East Lake Street in recent Star Tribune articles, here and also here.

        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
        Click here for current edition.

        Hennepin County will propose a plan to redevelop the 6.4 acre property at 2225 East Lake Street, currently owned by Minneapolis Public Schools. The multi-phased plan would include a Family Service Center along with new offices, retail, housing, parking, and space for the Midtown Farmers Market. View detail image here.

        You are invited to a public hearing on April 3 at 6:00pm at 2225 East Lake Street. Weigh in and get involved in shaping the plan including retail offerings, sustainability and urban agriculture, bike/walk connections, plaza design, and more. This is the April meeting of Corcoran Neighborhood Organization’s Land Use & Housing committee. The CNO Board will decide whether to support the plan based on input at the April 3 meeting.

        Childcare, translation for Spanish speakers, and light refreshments will be provided at the meeting.

        Invite your neighbors and friends to also attend by inviting them on facebook.

        Questions? Contact Eric at eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org or 612-724-7457.

        Read more about development on East Lake Street in recent Star Tribune articles, here and also here.

        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
        Click here for current edition.

        © 2014 Corcoran News

          Audiencia pública sobre planes para desarrollar el área del Mercado de Granjeros de Midtown

          Mon, 2014-04-14 14:45
          Corcoran News

          El Condado de Hennepin propondrá un plan para desarrollar la propiedad (6,4 acres) de 2225 East Lake Street, que actualmente pertenece a las Escuelas Públicas de Minneapolis.

          Está usted invitado a una audiencia pública, el 3 de abril a las 6:00 p.m. en 2225 East Lake Street. Participe e involúcrese en dar forma al plan que incluye ofrecimiento de ventas al menudeo, sustentabilidad y agricultura urbanística, conexiones para andar en bicis y para caminar, diseño de la plaza y más. Esta junta de abril es del Comité de Uso de Tierra y Vivienda de la Organización del Vecindario Corcoran. Basándose en las aportaciones de la junta del 3 de abril, la Mesa Directiva de CNO decidirá si apoya, o no, el plan.

          En la junta se proveerá cuidado de niños, traducción para hispanohablantes y refrigerios ligeros.

          ¿Tiene preguntas? Favor de contactar a Eric: eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org, o bien al teléfono 612-724-7457.

          Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
          Click here for current edition.

          El Condado de Hennepin propondrá un plan para desarrollar la propiedad (6,4 acres) de 2225 East Lake Street, que actualmente pertenece a las Escuelas Públicas de Minneapolis.

          Está usted invitado a una audiencia pública, el 3 de abril a las 6:00 p.m. en 2225 East Lake Street. Participe e involúcrese en dar forma al plan que incluye ofrecimiento de ventas al menudeo, sustentabilidad y agricultura urbanística, conexiones para andar en bicis y para caminar, diseño de la plaza y más. Esta junta de abril es del Comité de Uso de Tierra y Vivienda de la Organización del Vecindario Corcoran. Basándose en las aportaciones de la junta del 3 de abril, la Mesa Directiva de CNO decidirá si apoya, o no, el plan.

          En la junta se proveerá cuidado de niños, traducción para hispanohablantes y refrigerios ligeros.

          ¿Tiene preguntas? Favor de contactar a Eric: eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org, o bien al teléfono 612-724-7457.

          Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
          Click here for current edition.

          © 2014 Corcoran News

            Serious discussion on a new Webber Library underway, public meetings set for April 15, May 10

            Sun, 2014-04-13 14:56
            Susan Quist Camden News

            Plans to build a new Webber Park Library are moving ahead and it couldn’t be too soon. There was a celebration for the opening of the temporary Webber Library on Lyndale and 42nd on March 11, and the old library is scheduled to be torn down in April. In a show of good faith to move this project forward Hennepin County Commissioner Linda Higgins and county staff from library and property services held a meeting at Folwell Park on Saturday March 8. It was the first of a series of meetings intended to collect information regarding our community’s needs in a library.

            Trudy Richter of Richardson, Richter and Associates, facilitated the meeting. Although the meeting was announced post-publishing of the North and Camden newspapers, there was a good showing of local bibliophiles, including members of the Friends of Webber Park Library (FWPL), residents from Victory, Webber-Camden and Bottineau neighborhoods, and members of the former Webber Park Task Force, which worked hard to save the library from permanent closure in 2006. Also in attendance were members of the Hennepin County Library Board, Lois Langer Thompson Director of Hennepin County Library, State Representative Joe Mullery and City Council President Barb Johnson.

            Hennepin County Property Services and Project Manager Valerie Carr gave an overview of the planning process. The intent is to take what is learned from community input and make a functional program, which considers the size, site and features of the building, as well as who will be served by the new library and what their needs will be. Carr said there will be opportunities for community involvement throughout the entire process, with two meetings scheduled at Folwell Park: Tuesday April 15, from 6-7:30 p.m. and Saturday May 10, from 9:30-11 a.m. The final phase will be to present a budget to the county for approval, with ground breaking and construction to follow. This will most likely be a multi-year process.

            Community members were invited to join the Community Advisory Committee. Lois Lenroot-Ernt, HN County Capital Projects, gave an overview of the committee stating that the committee would examine the unique needs of the community and will be made up of community residents, members of FWPL, representatives from city and state government, and staff from Hennepin County Library. Questions that the committee will focus on include: How do we use our library now and how do we address future needs of our community?

            Those present were invited to weigh-in on six questions: What one thing would you like us to know about the Camden Community? What services and building features would make you visit the library more often? What types of space are important to you? What services would attract people who don’t use the library now? What do you do when you come to the library? What services would attract people who don’t use the library now?

            There were a myriad of responses to all of the questions. Some highlights include: People need good services and reasons to stay in this community. Maintain the name of the library – Webber – because it has special meaning to our community through the story of the original donors and the loss of their son John Deere Webber. Align the new library with the trails and easy walking access. Support e-book readers. Include spaces for students and children including group work areas, a story-time area, study carrels and tutoring areas. Include space for community meetings. For services people wanted a book club, coffee shop, free tax services, computers for job searches, homework helpers and more hours. Regarding design, many stated they want a building that fits in physically to the surrounding community and the use of green technology. It was also suggested that a room dedicated to telling the historical significance of the parkway be included in the design.

            During the comments portion of the meeting a question was asked regarding the budget. Commissioner Higgins stated that there is an initial budget of $7 million to get the project started, but that the budget is fluid. A final budget for the project would be approved at the end of the study process. Val Holler, Patrick Henry teacher and Webber resident, expressed a concern regarding those not present and encouraged the county to reach out more broadly to constituents. Commissioner Higgins replied that this meeting was pulled together quickly because it had been three months since the last meeting, and she committed to a strong effort to reach out to the community at large for the future meetings. Victory resident Ann Kaari expressed concerns that there have been a lot of prior attempts to get this project off the ground and wanted assurance that this time it will be different. Commissioner Higgins replied, “You have a new commissioner now.”

            In regards to the location of the new library, the county is moving forward with acquiring land at Humboldt and 45th Avenues, through purchase or eminent domain. Michael Noonan, Hennepin County Manager of Real Estate, stated that at this time the “Kowalski’s property has been taken off the market so that we have total flexibility.”

            The next Webber Library meeting hosted by Higgins and Hennepin County staff, will be held at the Folwell Park gym, 1615 Dowling Ave. N., on Tuesday, April 15, from 6 to 7:30 pm and Saturday, May 10, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. These meetings will continue the planning process for a new library as well as update the community on the progress of the capital plan. All are welcome to attend and participate. The temporary library on Lyndale and 42nd is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

            Plans to build a new Webber Park Library are moving ahead and it couldn’t be too soon. There was a celebration for the opening of the temporary Webber Library on Lyndale and 42nd on March 11, and the old library is scheduled to be torn down in April. In a show of good faith to move this project forward Hennepin County Commissioner Linda Higgins and county staff from library and property services held a meeting at Folwell Park on Saturday March 8. It was the first of a series of meetings intended to collect information regarding our community’s needs in a library.

            Trudy Richter of Richardson, Richter and Associates, facilitated the meeting. Although the meeting was announced post-publishing of the North and Camden newspapers, there was a good showing of local bibliophiles, including members of the Friends of Webber Park Library (FWPL), residents from Victory, Webber-Camden and Bottineau neighborhoods, and members of the former Webber Park Task Force, which worked hard to save the library from permanent closure in 2006. Also in attendance were members of the Hennepin County Library Board, Lois Langer Thompson Director of Hennepin County Library, State Representative Joe Mullery and City Council President Barb Johnson.

            Hennepin County Property Services and Project Manager Valerie Carr gave an overview of the planning process. The intent is to take what is learned from community input and make a functional program, which considers the size, site and features of the building, as well as who will be served by the new library and what their needs will be. Carr said there will be opportunities for community involvement throughout the entire process, with two meetings scheduled at Folwell Park: Tuesday April 15, from 6-7:30 p.m. and Saturday May 10, from 9:30-11 a.m. The final phase will be to present a budget to the county for approval, with ground breaking and construction to follow. This will most likely be a multi-year process.

            Community members were invited to join the Community Advisory Committee. Lois Lenroot-Ernt, HN County Capital Projects, gave an overview of the committee stating that the committee would examine the unique needs of the community and will be made up of community residents, members of FWPL, representatives from city and state government, and staff from Hennepin County Library. Questions that the committee will focus on include: How do we use our library now and how do we address future needs of our community?

            Those present were invited to weigh-in on six questions: What one thing would you like us to know about the Camden Community? What services and building features would make you visit the library more often? What types of space are important to you? What services would attract people who don’t use the library now? What do you do when you come to the library? What services would attract people who don’t use the library now?

            There were a myriad of responses to all of the questions. Some highlights include: People need good services and reasons to stay in this community. Maintain the name of the library – Webber – because it has special meaning to our community through the story of the original donors and the loss of their son John Deere Webber. Align the new library with the trails and easy walking access. Support e-book readers. Include spaces for students and children including group work areas, a story-time area, study carrels and tutoring areas. Include space for community meetings. For services people wanted a book club, coffee shop, free tax services, computers for job searches, homework helpers and more hours. Regarding design, many stated they want a building that fits in physically to the surrounding community and the use of green technology. It was also suggested that a room dedicated to telling the historical significance of the parkway be included in the design.

            During the comments portion of the meeting a question was asked regarding the budget. Commissioner Higgins stated that there is an initial budget of $7 million to get the project started, but that the budget is fluid. A final budget for the project would be approved at the end of the study process. Val Holler, Patrick Henry teacher and Webber resident, expressed a concern regarding those not present and encouraged the county to reach out more broadly to constituents. Commissioner Higgins replied that this meeting was pulled together quickly because it had been three months since the last meeting, and she committed to a strong effort to reach out to the community at large for the future meetings. Victory resident Ann Kaari expressed concerns that there have been a lot of prior attempts to get this project off the ground and wanted assurance that this time it will be different. Commissioner Higgins replied, “You have a new commissioner now.”

            In regards to the location of the new library, the county is moving forward with acquiring land at Humboldt and 45th Avenues, through purchase or eminent domain. Michael Noonan, Hennepin County Manager of Real Estate, stated that at this time the “Kowalski’s property has been taken off the market so that we have total flexibility.”

            The next Webber Library meeting hosted by Higgins and Hennepin County staff, will be held at the Folwell Park gym, 1615 Dowling Ave. N., on Tuesday, April 15, from 6 to 7:30 pm and Saturday, May 10, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. These meetings will continue the planning process for a new library as well as update the community on the progress of the capital plan. All are welcome to attend and participate. The temporary library on Lyndale and 42nd is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

            © 2014 Camden News

              Join Corcoran Community Garden! ¡Únase El Jardin Comunicario de Corcoran!

              Fri, 2014-04-11 16:57
              Corcoran News

              Find an application inserted in this newspaper – due May 1

              Corcoran Community Garden is located at 3301 24th Ave S (front yard of CenturyLink Property), and is operated collectively by its Gardeners in collaboration with the Corcoran Neighborhood Organization (CNO), which holds a lease with the property owner.

              Plots are 4’x12’ in size. Several accessible raised bed plots will be available for disabled gardeners. Cost for all plots is $40 for one season; $10 of this will be returned at the end of the season after approved inspection by the Garden Coordinator confirmin that final clean-up of your plot has occurred. If you would like to share a plot with another gardener, please specify this in the application.

              Find an application form inserted in this newspaper, or stop by the CNO office to pick one up. Garden plots will be assigned to applicants using a blind lottery administered by CNO. The lottery will give top priority to Corcoran residents who do not have access to gardening space at home, but everyone is welcome to apply for a plot. Applications are due Thursday, May 1 at 4:00 p.m.

              Questions? Please contact Eric Gustafson, CNO Executive Director, at eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org or 612-724-7457.

               

              Encuentra un formulario de aplicación en este periódico – debido 1 de mayo

              El Jardín de Corcoran está ubicado en 3301 24th Ave S (patio delantero de la propiedad de CenturyLink), y es operado conjuntamente por los jardineros en colaboración con la Corcoran Neighborhood Association (Organización del Vecindario Corcoran, CNO), que tiene un contrato de arrendamiento con el terrateniente.

              Las parcelas son 4'x12 'de tamaño. Varias parcelas accesibles para jardineros con discapacidades físicas. El costo de todas las parcelas es de $30 por una temporada, $10 serán devuelto al final de la temporada después de la inspección aprobado por el Coordinador de Jardín al confirmar que se ha producido la limpieza final de la trama. Si usted desea compartir una parcela con otro jardinero, por favor especificarlo en la solicitud.

              Encuentra un formulario de aplicación en este periódico o visitar la oficina de CNO para recoger uno. Parcelas se asignarán a solicitantes mediante una lotería administrada por CNO. El sorteo le dará prioridad a residentes del vecindario Corcoran que no tienen acceso a un espacio de jardinería en su hogar, pero todos son bienvenidos a aplicar para una parcela. Formularios debido por 1 de mayo en las 4:00 de la tarde.

              ¿Preguntas? Por favor, póngase en contacto con Eric Gustafson, CNO Director Ejecutivo, en eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org o 612-724-7457.

              Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
              Click here for current edition.

              Find an application inserted in this newspaper – due May 1

              Corcoran Community Garden is located at 3301 24th Ave S (front yard of CenturyLink Property), and is operated collectively by its Gardeners in collaboration with the Corcoran Neighborhood Organization (CNO), which holds a lease with the property owner.

              Plots are 4’x12’ in size. Several accessible raised bed plots will be available for disabled gardeners. Cost for all plots is $40 for one season; $10 of this will be returned at the end of the season after approved inspection by the Garden Coordinator confirmin that final clean-up of your plot has occurred. If you would like to share a plot with another gardener, please specify this in the application.

              Find an application form inserted in this newspaper, or stop by the CNO office to pick one up. Garden plots will be assigned to applicants using a blind lottery administered by CNO. The lottery will give top priority to Corcoran residents who do not have access to gardening space at home, but everyone is welcome to apply for a plot. Applications are due Thursday, May 1 at 4:00 p.m.

              Questions? Please contact Eric Gustafson, CNO Executive Director, at eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org or 612-724-7457.

               

              Encuentra un formulario de aplicación en este periódico – debido 1 de mayo

              El Jardín de Corcoran está ubicado en 3301 24th Ave S (patio delantero de la propiedad de CenturyLink), y es operado conjuntamente por los jardineros en colaboración con la Corcoran Neighborhood Association (Organización del Vecindario Corcoran, CNO), que tiene un contrato de arrendamiento con el terrateniente.

              Las parcelas son 4'x12 'de tamaño. Varias parcelas accesibles para jardineros con discapacidades físicas. El costo de todas las parcelas es de $30 por una temporada, $10 serán devuelto al final de la temporada después de la inspección aprobado por el Coordinador de Jardín al confirmar que se ha producido la limpieza final de la trama. Si usted desea compartir una parcela con otro jardinero, por favor especificarlo en la solicitud.

              Encuentra un formulario de aplicación en este periódico o visitar la oficina de CNO para recoger uno. Parcelas se asignarán a solicitantes mediante una lotería administrada por CNO. El sorteo le dará prioridad a residentes del vecindario Corcoran que no tienen acceso a un espacio de jardinería en su hogar, pero todos son bienvenidos a aplicar para una parcela. Formularios debido por 1 de mayo en las 4:00 de la tarde.

              ¿Preguntas? Por favor, póngase en contacto con Eric Gustafson, CNO Director Ejecutivo, en eric [at] corcoranneighborhood [dot] org o 612-724-7457.

              Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
              Click here for current edition.

              © 2014 Corcoran News

                CNO endorses Bikeways for Everyone campaign

                Fri, 2014-04-11 16:49
                Corcoran News

                Image a citywide network of connected bikeways that make everyone from children to grandparents fell safe riding anywhere in Minneapolis. This is the vision of the Bikeways for Everyone campaign, championed by the Minneapolis Bicycle Coalition, and now endorsed by the resident member Board of Directors of CNO. If you’re passionate about biking, contact Corcoran resident Mary Robinson <CorcoranBikes [at] gmail [dot] com> to get involved in our neighborhood’s support of the campaign.

                Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                Click here for current edition.

                Image a citywide network of connected bikeways that make everyone from children to grandparents fell safe riding anywhere in Minneapolis. This is the vision of the Bikeways for Everyone campaign, championed by the Minneapolis Bicycle Coalition, and now endorsed by the resident member Board of Directors of CNO. If you’re passionate about biking, contact Corcoran resident Mary Robinson <CorcoranBikes [at] gmail [dot] com> to get involved in our neighborhood’s support of the campaign.

                Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                Click here for current edition.

                © 2014 Corcoran News

                  Local stories at March membership event

                  Fri, 2014-04-11 16:43
                  RossJoy Corcoran News

                  Over 30 community members of Corcoran neighborhood came together to listen and share local stories on the evening of Thursday, March 19. We feasted on a delicious East African meal of chicken legs & stew, goat meat, Somali rice, hummus and bananas.

                  Joyce Wisdom, Executive Director of Lake Street Council, shared several histories of properties along Lake Street, the storied commercial main street of South Minneapolis. Wisdom spearheaded the Museum in the Streets project, which features bilingual plaques and walking tours that capture the area’s historical identity.

                  Did you know that there used to be a Porky’s Drive In restaurant and headquarters of Burma Shave on the corner of 21st Ave and Lake Street?

                  Osman Ali, Founder of the Somali Artifact and Cultural Museum, also shared the stories behind several artifacts that were brought to the event. One of the favorite artifacts was a wooden head rest that Somali men used more 100 years ago. While sleeping in the bush, men would prop their heads up with the wooden rest so that they would avoid waking up to a bad hair day.

                  Stories from community members are currently being transcribed, so make sure to pick up the next edition of the Corcoran News to read more histories that were shared during the event.

                  Special thanks to all those in attendance, and to Osman Ali for hosting this community event at his Sanaag Restaurant at 3007 Cedar Ave S.

                  Inside Sagaan Restaurant space during the March 19 event, An Evening of Storytelling, organized by CNO. 


                  From left to right: Erin Salinas, Anna Baker, Myra Burnette, Ryan Peterson and Gerry Tyrrell share stories about the founding of the Midtown Farmers Market.

                  Andres Diaz (left), Andrés Salinas and Silvia Perez share "unos gran historias" about the Corcoran and South Minneapolis community.

                  Osman Ali (center) spoke about his founding of the Somali Artifact and Cultural Museum, which is open for scheduled tours at Plaza Verde, 1516 East Lake Street, Suite 11.

                  Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                  Click here for current edition.

                  Over 30 community members of Corcoran neighborhood came together to listen and share local stories on the evening of Thursday, March 19. We feasted on a delicious East African meal of chicken legs & stew, goat meat, Somali rice, hummus and bananas.

                  Joyce Wisdom, Executive Director of Lake Street Council, shared several histories of properties along Lake Street, the storied commercial main street of South Minneapolis. Wisdom spearheaded the Museum in the Streets project, which features bilingual plaques and walking tours that capture the area’s historical identity.

                  Did you know that there used to be a Porky’s Drive In restaurant and headquarters of Burma Shave on the corner of 21st Ave and Lake Street?

                  Osman Ali, Founder of the Somali Artifact and Cultural Museum, also shared the stories behind several artifacts that were brought to the event. One of the favorite artifacts was a wooden head rest that Somali men used more 100 years ago. While sleeping in the bush, men would prop their heads up with the wooden rest so that they would avoid waking up to a bad hair day.

                  Stories from community members are currently being transcribed, so make sure to pick up the next edition of the Corcoran News to read more histories that were shared during the event.

                  Special thanks to all those in attendance, and to Osman Ali for hosting this community event at his Sanaag Restaurant at 3007 Cedar Ave S.

                  Inside Sagaan Restaurant space during the March 19 event, An Evening of Storytelling, organized by CNO. 


                  From left to right: Erin Salinas, Anna Baker, Myra Burnette, Ryan Peterson and Gerry Tyrrell share stories about the founding of the Midtown Farmers Market.

                  Andres Diaz (left), Andrés Salinas and Silvia Perez share "unos gran historias" about the Corcoran and South Minneapolis community.

                  Osman Ali (center) spoke about his founding of the Somali Artifact and Cultural Museum, which is open for scheduled tours at Plaza Verde, 1516 East Lake Street, Suite 11.

                  Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                  Click here for current edition.

                  © 2014 Corcoran News

                    South Minneapolis Housing Fair: It's time to get those home improvement projects started!

                    Fri, 2014-04-11 16:32
                    Corcoran News

                    The 20th annual South Minneapolis Housing Fair is being held April 5th from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm at the Minneapolis Sports Center, Midtown YWCA at 2121 East Lake Street. The Fair is produced to provide home improvement information to Minneapolis residents and to support local community resources.

                    The Fair is free to the public and this year features The Minnesota Renewable Energy Society Tiny Solar Home, local contractors, the University of Minnesota Master Gardener, and experts from the City of Minneapolis who will answer your questions on everything from building codes, solid waste and graffiti removal.

                    The Fair-goers also make their own non-toxic chemical at the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization booth and build a birdhouse with Elpis Enterprises.

                    ‘How-to sessions’ are being offered every half hour on a variety of home improvement topics including; landscaping, solar energy rebates and tax credits, growing a monarch garden, tile design, air conditioning for homes with radiators, working with contractors, how to work with a designer, preventing ice dams, and loan options from Neighborhood Housing Service of Minneapolis.

                    Directories are available at your local South Minneapolis library and Neighborhood Organization.

                    The resource directory includes information on quality contractors, helpful articles about working with contractors, plus, a list of evening workshops offered at a variety of locations throughout Minneapolis in collaboration with Minneapolis Community Education.

                    If you are interested in volunteering to help at the fair, or would like information about participating as an exhibitor next year, contact the Housing Fair Manager at Manager [at] housingfair [dot] org. Visit www.housingfair.org for more information on exhibitors and sessions.

                    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                    Click here for current edition.

                    The 20th annual South Minneapolis Housing Fair is being held April 5th from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm at the Minneapolis Sports Center, Midtown YWCA at 2121 East Lake Street. The Fair is produced to provide home improvement information to Minneapolis residents and to support local community resources.

                    The Fair is free to the public and this year features The Minnesota Renewable Energy Society Tiny Solar Home, local contractors, the University of Minnesota Master Gardener, and experts from the City of Minneapolis who will answer your questions on everything from building codes, solid waste and graffiti removal.

                    The Fair-goers also make their own non-toxic chemical at the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization booth and build a birdhouse with Elpis Enterprises.

                    ‘How-to sessions’ are being offered every half hour on a variety of home improvement topics including; landscaping, solar energy rebates and tax credits, growing a monarch garden, tile design, air conditioning for homes with radiators, working with contractors, how to work with a designer, preventing ice dams, and loan options from Neighborhood Housing Service of Minneapolis.

                    Directories are available at your local South Minneapolis library and Neighborhood Organization.

                    The resource directory includes information on quality contractors, helpful articles about working with contractors, plus, a list of evening workshops offered at a variety of locations throughout Minneapolis in collaboration with Minneapolis Community Education.

                    If you are interested in volunteering to help at the fair, or would like information about participating as an exhibitor next year, contact the Housing Fair Manager at Manager [at] housingfair [dot] org. Visit www.housingfair.org for more information on exhibitors and sessions.

                    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                    Click here for current edition.

                    © 2014 Corcoran News

                      Corcoran News wants YOU!

                      Fri, 2014-04-11 16:20
                      Corcoran News

                      Corcoran News invites all community members to submit photos articles, creative writing, artwork, and opinions to the newspaper! Volunteers are welcome to become involved in other aspects of the papers well: copy editing, recruiting material, and designing the layout.

                      If you speak a language in addition to English, consider helping make out paper more accessible to all Corcoran residents by translating one article per month. Send us an email at news [at] corcoranneighbothood [dot] org to learn more about volunteer opportunities or to submit material.

                      The next submission deadline is April 14th, however, feel free to submit material any time during the month. If it doesn't end up in the newspaper, it might end up in the Advocate (online newsletter), the CNO website, or even the Twin Cities Daily Planet!

                      Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                      Click here for current edition.

                      Corcoran News invites all community members to submit photos articles, creative writing, artwork, and opinions to the newspaper! Volunteers are welcome to become involved in other aspects of the papers well: copy editing, recruiting material, and designing the layout.

                      If you speak a language in addition to English, consider helping make out paper more accessible to all Corcoran residents by translating one article per month. Send us an email at news [at] corcoranneighbothood [dot] org to learn more about volunteer opportunities or to submit material.

                      The next submission deadline is April 14th, however, feel free to submit material any time during the month. If it doesn't end up in the newspaper, it might end up in the Advocate (online newsletter), the CNO website, or even the Twin Cities Daily Planet!

                      Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                      Click here for current edition.

                      © 2014 Corcoran News

                        Save the date: Midtown Farmers Market opening day May 3rd!

                        Fri, 2014-04-11 16:16
                        Corcoran News

                        Spring is here and opening day for the Midtown Farmers Market is right around the corner, so save the date: May 3rd is opening day at Midtown! The Market will return for its 12th season at 2225 E. Lake Street and we have lots of new and exciting activities, entertainment, events and vendors in the works, along with many of the friendly and familiar favorites you’ve grown to love over the years. Despite recent news surrounding the possibility of the purchase and development of the property and home of the Market at 2225 E. Lake, the Market will remain at its current location and will for the foreseeable future.

                        Some things you’ll want to keep an eye out for this season include new themed market event days like Youth Leadership Day, African American Heritage Day and a Fiesta de Maiz, along with some novel and intriguing offerings from vendors with products like wood-fired pizza, locally sourced nut butters and fresh frozen custard. They’ll be plenty of great activities for everyone as well including 2nd Saturday Children’s Activities, Story Time with the East Lake Library, Midtown Flavors Cooking Demos, Yoga at the Market and Blood Drives with Memorial Blood Centers. Market staff has been hard at work over the winter making sure this season will be one to remember. We’re excited to get the 2014 season underway and to see the many familiar faces that frequent the Market each week, so come pay us a visit this season!

                        Market Events Calendar:
                        May 10- Mother’s Day Celebration
                        May 31- Youth Leadership Day
                        June 21- African American Heritage Day
                        July 26- Tomato Tasting
                        August 16- Bike Day
                        August 23- Fiesta de Maiz
                        September 13- Scandinavian Day
                        September 26- Native American Celebration

                        The Midtown Farmers Market is located at the corner of East Lake Street and 22nd Avenue South and offers fresh, local goods every Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm from May-June and Tuesday from 3:00pm-7:00pm June-October.

                        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                        Click here for current edition.

                        Spring is here and opening day for the Midtown Farmers Market is right around the corner, so save the date: May 3rd is opening day at Midtown! The Market will return for its 12th season at 2225 E. Lake Street and we have lots of new and exciting activities, entertainment, events and vendors in the works, along with many of the friendly and familiar favorites you’ve grown to love over the years. Despite recent news surrounding the possibility of the purchase and development of the property and home of the Market at 2225 E. Lake, the Market will remain at its current location and will for the foreseeable future.

                        Some things you’ll want to keep an eye out for this season include new themed market event days like Youth Leadership Day, African American Heritage Day and a Fiesta de Maiz, along with some novel and intriguing offerings from vendors with products like wood-fired pizza, locally sourced nut butters and fresh frozen custard. They’ll be plenty of great activities for everyone as well including 2nd Saturday Children’s Activities, Story Time with the East Lake Library, Midtown Flavors Cooking Demos, Yoga at the Market and Blood Drives with Memorial Blood Centers. Market staff has been hard at work over the winter making sure this season will be one to remember. We’re excited to get the 2014 season underway and to see the many familiar faces that frequent the Market each week, so come pay us a visit this season!

                        Market Events Calendar:
                        May 10- Mother’s Day Celebration
                        May 31- Youth Leadership Day
                        June 21- African American Heritage Day
                        July 26- Tomato Tasting
                        August 16- Bike Day
                        August 23- Fiesta de Maiz
                        September 13- Scandinavian Day
                        September 26- Native American Celebration

                        The Midtown Farmers Market is located at the corner of East Lake Street and 22nd Avenue South and offers fresh, local goods every Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm from May-June and Tuesday from 3:00pm-7:00pm June-October.

                        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                        Click here for current edition.

                        © 2014 Corcoran News

                          Upcoming block leader training

                          Fri, 2014-04-11 16:15
                          Corcoran News

                          Date: Wednesday, April 23rd
                          Time: 6:30 to 8:00 PM
                          Location: Minneapolis Police Dept 3rd Precinct, 3000 Minnehaha Avenue

                          Neighbors knowing neighbors and looking out for one another is the best crime prevention tools. Community-based crime prevention has a much greater impact on reducing crime than enforcement alone.

                          Block leaders receive crimes that are reported within two blocks of their residence. If you are interested in being a block leader or be a co-leader with your current block leader, please think about coming to an upcoming training.

                          Crime Prevention Block Leaders help build community one block at a time and work with neighbors and MPD if there is a problem on the block. Block Leaders also develop a communication tool where residents have the ability to contact each other because neighbors who are informed are the strongest crime prevention tool.

                          For questions, contact: Karen Notsch, Crime Prevention Specialist, Minneapolis Police Department, 3rd Precinct. (612) 673-2856 / karen [dot] notsch [at] minneapolismn [dot] gov.

                          Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                          Click here for current edition.

                          Date: Wednesday, April 23rd
                          Time: 6:30 to 8:00 PM
                          Location: Minneapolis Police Dept 3rd Precinct, 3000 Minnehaha Avenue

                          Neighbors knowing neighbors and looking out for one another is the best crime prevention tools. Community-based crime prevention has a much greater impact on reducing crime than enforcement alone.

                          Block leaders receive crimes that are reported within two blocks of their residence. If you are interested in being a block leader or be a co-leader with your current block leader, please think about coming to an upcoming training.

                          Crime Prevention Block Leaders help build community one block at a time and work with neighbors and MPD if there is a problem on the block. Block Leaders also develop a communication tool where residents have the ability to contact each other because neighbors who are informed are the strongest crime prevention tool.

                          For questions, contact: Karen Notsch, Crime Prevention Specialist, Minneapolis Police Department, 3rd Precinct. (612) 673-2856 / karen [dot] notsch [at] minneapolismn [dot] gov.

                          Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                          Click here for current edition.

                          © 2014 Corcoran News

                            Lonesome Valley: Mexican pet best souvenir of all

                            Fri, 2014-04-11 16:09
                            Corcoran News

                            Every winter it seems harder to come home from vacation in Mexico. This year, though, I brought a piece of the place home with me -- a kitten.

                            Zihuatenejo has grown since I first went there in the ‘70’s, but the small hotel I like is still the same. Its balconies overlook the cobbled street, the lagoon, and the footbridge over it. Across the bridge are the fishing pier, the square, the market, shops, and cafes.

                            One morning, as I crossed the bridge, I saw the kitten, crouched on the packed dirt beside the bridge, head down Her black-and-white coat stretched over protruding bones.

                            She didn’t run when I got close. She let me pet her, and seemed to like it. She squinted at me from a scabbed, swollen face, and mewed hoarsely. I saw that her face and paws were covered with brown, scabby mange.

                            On my next trip across the bridge, I bought cat food and poured some out for her. Starved as she was, the kitten wouldn’t eat unless I sat and petted her. She purred like a tiny outboard motor as I rubbed her soiled, white belly.

                            The next morning I took the kitten to a shelter, where she got a shot to cure her mange. I carried her back across the bridge, and filled her dish again. If her mange went away, I thought, and I fed her regularly, maybe she’d be all right when I left.

                            That night I heard barking, and saw, from my balcony, the kitten crouched on the ground, under attack by two feral dogs. She hissed and clawed at them, but didn’t run. If she lost her nerve and ran, they would kill her.

                            But it wasn’t the danger that made me decide to take her home. It was the love in her squinty eyes, her motorboat purr, and the way she threw herself against me whenever I got near. I spent hours on the internet, learning the requirements. I changed my flight because my airline didn’t accept pets on international flights. I bought a carrier, and paid a vet to board the kitten till my departure date. He gave her shots and filled out a health certificate.

                            The kitten, now named Spider, is adjusting nicely. She has seen more new things in a month than most cats in their lifetimes: plane and car rides, worm medicine and shots, a dish that’s always full, the warmth of rugs and quilts. At first she hid and hissed at the other pets. Finally she relaxed enough to play.

                            By now, the kitten has explored every corner, and made her peace with the other pets. One mild day, she even ventured out onto the snow, then rushed back, shaking her paws.

                            Even though she’s sleek now, I remember how she looked when I first saw her, crouched in the dirt beside the bridge. She will always remind me of Mexico.

                            Judy Ojard is a Corcoran resident.

                            Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                            Click here for current edition.

                            Every winter it seems harder to come home from vacation in Mexico. This year, though, I brought a piece of the place home with me -- a kitten.

                            Zihuatenejo has grown since I first went there in the ‘70’s, but the small hotel I like is still the same. Its balconies overlook the cobbled street, the lagoon, and the footbridge over it. Across the bridge are the fishing pier, the square, the market, shops, and cafes.

                            One morning, as I crossed the bridge, I saw the kitten, crouched on the packed dirt beside the bridge, head down Her black-and-white coat stretched over protruding bones.

                            She didn’t run when I got close. She let me pet her, and seemed to like it. She squinted at me from a scabbed, swollen face, and mewed hoarsely. I saw that her face and paws were covered with brown, scabby mange.

                            On my next trip across the bridge, I bought cat food and poured some out for her. Starved as she was, the kitten wouldn’t eat unless I sat and petted her. She purred like a tiny outboard motor as I rubbed her soiled, white belly.

                            The next morning I took the kitten to a shelter, where she got a shot to cure her mange. I carried her back across the bridge, and filled her dish again. If her mange went away, I thought, and I fed her regularly, maybe she’d be all right when I left.

                            That night I heard barking, and saw, from my balcony, the kitten crouched on the ground, under attack by two feral dogs. She hissed and clawed at them, but didn’t run. If she lost her nerve and ran, they would kill her.

                            But it wasn’t the danger that made me decide to take her home. It was the love in her squinty eyes, her motorboat purr, and the way she threw herself against me whenever I got near. I spent hours on the internet, learning the requirements. I changed my flight because my airline didn’t accept pets on international flights. I bought a carrier, and paid a vet to board the kitten till my departure date. He gave her shots and filled out a health certificate.

                            The kitten, now named Spider, is adjusting nicely. She has seen more new things in a month than most cats in their lifetimes: plane and car rides, worm medicine and shots, a dish that’s always full, the warmth of rugs and quilts. At first she hid and hissed at the other pets. Finally she relaxed enough to play.

                            By now, the kitten has explored every corner, and made her peace with the other pets. One mild day, she even ventured out onto the snow, then rushed back, shaking her paws.

                            Even though she’s sleek now, I remember how she looked when I first saw her, crouched in the dirt beside the bridge. She will always remind me of Mexico.

                            Judy Ojard is a Corcoran resident.

                            Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                            Click here for current edition.

                            © 2014 Corcoran News

                              Confetti with friends

                              Fri, 2014-04-11 16:09
                              Corcoran News

                              According to a June, 2013 report, adult cell phone ownership rates have reached 91 percent and virtually all of them are equipped with free text-messaging (after the pricey monthly fee that most of us begrudgingly volunteer). If you are among these ranks, then you can join me in a little game I invented years ago. It’s called “Confetti” and it will surprise and delight.

                              This game is to be played when with a group of friends. Look about the room and discern what mutual friend is not present. Agree that each of you will send this friend a text message about an agreed upon subject. It can be as simple as “What Betsy is doing right now” or “Jose's next career move”. You may want to get more specific and elaborate. Everyone takes five minutes or so to think of and enter a personalized, creative message based on this previously agreed upon subject.

                              But, wait! Don't send it just yet. Make sure everybody is ready with their message. Everyone then holds up their phone and simultaneously presses send. Confetti! Now you are free to share what silliness you each came up with and hear back from your surprised (and hopefully delighted) friend.

                              There is much magic and play beneath the surface of our seemingly mundane lives. It’s my hope that you discover and/or create this magic and spread the joy. If you decide to participate in this experiment, I'd love to hear about it!

                              Ben is a resident of 21st Ave and founder of the Corcoran Free School. He can be contacted at <blinzme1 [at] gmail [dot] com>.

                              Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                              Click here for current edition.

                              According to a June, 2013 report, adult cell phone ownership rates have reached 91 percent and virtually all of them are equipped with free text-messaging (after the pricey monthly fee that most of us begrudgingly volunteer). If you are among these ranks, then you can join me in a little game I invented years ago. It’s called “Confetti” and it will surprise and delight.

                              This game is to be played when with a group of friends. Look about the room and discern what mutual friend is not present. Agree that each of you will send this friend a text message about an agreed upon subject. It can be as simple as “What Betsy is doing right now” or “Jose's next career move”. You may want to get more specific and elaborate. Everyone takes five minutes or so to think of and enter a personalized, creative message based on this previously agreed upon subject.

                              But, wait! Don't send it just yet. Make sure everybody is ready with their message. Everyone then holds up their phone and simultaneously presses send. Confetti! Now you are free to share what silliness you each came up with and hear back from your surprised (and hopefully delighted) friend.

                              There is much magic and play beneath the surface of our seemingly mundane lives. It’s my hope that you discover and/or create this magic and spread the joy. If you decide to participate in this experiment, I'd love to hear about it!

                              Ben is a resident of 21st Ave and founder of the Corcoran Free School. He can be contacted at <blinzme1 [at] gmail [dot] com>.

                              Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                              Click here for current edition.

                              © 2014 Corcoran News

                                Cold winter: Corcoran weatherizes

                                Fri, 2014-04-11 16:06
                                Timothy Denherd... Corcoran News

                                You’ve probably noticed the higher gas costs this winter. This is partly the deep cold. Most Corcoran homes are using more natural gas and high demand has sent prices soaring nationwide. Centerpoint has also raised rates to pay for repairs to an aging gas system.

                                As the gas industry shifts to “fracking”, impacted communities face toxic drinking water and more methane, a potent agent of climate chaos, enters the atmosphere. Dangerous accidents, like the Manitoba pipeline explosion that limited gas supply in the Twin Cities East Metro during a few sub-zero days this winter, are becoming common.

                                The industry that fuels our furnaces will get dirtier, costlier, and less reliable in the years ahead. So what can we do to keep Corcoran warm without fueling the problem?

                                I’ve insulated my home and helped others do so, run home energy workshops, and organized for city and state action to ensure that everyone can have warm, efficient homes and affordable clean energy. I’ve also seen how far we have to go. While canvassing Corcoran in 2012, I met dozens who complained about unaffordable bills, drafty homes, and hard choices between heat and groceries. While many of us take some steps towards energy smart living, I usually find many simple and low-cost actions left undone.

                                Starting in April, Our Power will help Corcoran residents make Do-It-Together home energy improvements. The campaign can help you host weatherization work parties with friends and neighbors to build an energy smart, clean powered community.

                                • A weatherization work party is a house party or block party that includes:
                                • A hands-on training in home energy improvements
                                • Time for neighbors to help each other weatherize
                                • Basic tools and bulk-rate weatherization supplies on hand
                                • Can launch further insulation group-buying, solar leasing, or community solar projects
                                • Food, games, or fun activities

                                Using Hennepin County funding, Our Power will cover work party training costs, mini-grants for party expenses, and $10 of free supplies for every participating household. Our Power is seeking neighbors to host a party this spring as a show-case, and then develop more work parties in the fall through National Night Out and other gatherings.

                                As we shift towards an energy future that’s affordable for our neighbors, fair for the communities that produce our energy, and safe for our planet, I’m excited to see our neighborhood lead. Please join me in starting weatherization work parties in Corcoran this year.

                                You can learn about Our Power and start or join a weatherization work party at www.mnourpower.org, or call (612) 548-1333.

                                Timothy DenHerder-Thomas is the General Manager of Cooperative Energy Futures.

                                Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                Click here for current edition.

                                You’ve probably noticed the higher gas costs this winter. This is partly the deep cold. Most Corcoran homes are using more natural gas and high demand has sent prices soaring nationwide. Centerpoint has also raised rates to pay for repairs to an aging gas system.

                                As the gas industry shifts to “fracking”, impacted communities face toxic drinking water and more methane, a potent agent of climate chaos, enters the atmosphere. Dangerous accidents, like the Manitoba pipeline explosion that limited gas supply in the Twin Cities East Metro during a few sub-zero days this winter, are becoming common.

                                The industry that fuels our furnaces will get dirtier, costlier, and less reliable in the years ahead. So what can we do to keep Corcoran warm without fueling the problem?

                                I’ve insulated my home and helped others do so, run home energy workshops, and organized for city and state action to ensure that everyone can have warm, efficient homes and affordable clean energy. I’ve also seen how far we have to go. While canvassing Corcoran in 2012, I met dozens who complained about unaffordable bills, drafty homes, and hard choices between heat and groceries. While many of us take some steps towards energy smart living, I usually find many simple and low-cost actions left undone.

                                Starting in April, Our Power will help Corcoran residents make Do-It-Together home energy improvements. The campaign can help you host weatherization work parties with friends and neighbors to build an energy smart, clean powered community.

                                • A weatherization work party is a house party or block party that includes:
                                • A hands-on training in home energy improvements
                                • Time for neighbors to help each other weatherize
                                • Basic tools and bulk-rate weatherization supplies on hand
                                • Can launch further insulation group-buying, solar leasing, or community solar projects
                                • Food, games, or fun activities

                                Using Hennepin County funding, Our Power will cover work party training costs, mini-grants for party expenses, and $10 of free supplies for every participating household. Our Power is seeking neighbors to host a party this spring as a show-case, and then develop more work parties in the fall through National Night Out and other gatherings.

                                As we shift towards an energy future that’s affordable for our neighbors, fair for the communities that produce our energy, and safe for our planet, I’m excited to see our neighborhood lead. Please join me in starting weatherization work parties in Corcoran this year.

                                You can learn about Our Power and start or join a weatherization work party at www.mnourpower.org, or call (612) 548-1333.

                                Timothy DenHerder-Thomas is the General Manager of Cooperative Energy Futures.

                                Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                Click here for current edition.

                                © 2014 Corcoran News

                                  Legal advice now offered free to tenants

                                  Fri, 2014-04-11 16:01
                                  Corcoran News

                                  Beginning April 1, 2014, tenants in Minneapolis that are interested in their rights as renters can receive free legal advice. Tenants may email the attorneys of HOME Line at www.homelinemn.org/e-mail-an-attorney/ or call the free Tenant Hotline: (612) 728-5767.

                                  HOME Line provides free legal, organizing, educational and advocacy services so tenants throughout Minnesota can solve their own rental housing problems. For 22 years, HOME Line has provided Minnesota renters with legal information regarding their rights. Staffed by lawyers, law students, and community volunteers, the tenant hotline has prevented over 11,700 evictions and saved renters over 21 million dollars in returned damage deposits and rent abatements. All calls are free and all information is kept confidential.

                                  Now that HOME Line is expanding their services to Minneapolis, learn more about HOME Line and about volunteering opportunities with their hotline at www.homelinemn.org.

                                  Beth Kodluboy is the Executive Director of HOME Line.

                                  Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                  Click here for current edition.

                                  Beginning April 1, 2014, tenants in Minneapolis that are interested in their rights as renters can receive free legal advice. Tenants may email the attorneys of HOME Line at www.homelinemn.org/e-mail-an-attorney/ or call the free Tenant Hotline: (612) 728-5767.

                                  HOME Line provides free legal, organizing, educational and advocacy services so tenants throughout Minnesota can solve their own rental housing problems. For 22 years, HOME Line has provided Minnesota renters with legal information regarding their rights. Staffed by lawyers, law students, and community volunteers, the tenant hotline has prevented over 11,700 evictions and saved renters over 21 million dollars in returned damage deposits and rent abatements. All calls are free and all information is kept confidential.

                                  Now that HOME Line is expanding their services to Minneapolis, learn more about HOME Line and about volunteering opportunities with their hotline at www.homelinemn.org.

                                  Beth Kodluboy is the Executive Director of HOME Line.

                                  Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                  Click here for current edition.

                                  © 2014 Corcoran News

                                    Safe and supportive schools

                                    Fri, 2014-04-11 15:54
                                    Corcoran News

                                    On March 3rd, kids from my school joined hundreds of other kids from the Twin Cities for a rally at the Capitol. We were there to encourage lawmakers to pass the “Safe and Supportive Schools Act” — also known as the anti-bullying bill. This bill will take Minnesota from having the weakest anti-bullying law in the country to the strongest. At the rally there were many kids who held signs that listed how they had been bullied. Not surprising since “11 percent of all kids are bullied weekly; over 30 percent (say) they’re viewed as different.”

                                    When I interviewed Sophie Rothenberger for my article on South High School she was happy that her school had specific policies to prevent bullying. The school also has counselors that the kids can talk with – even the kids who are the bullies. My school also takes this topic very serious. The Southside Family Charter School 2013-2014 Family Handbook includes a section about their Bullying Prohibition Policy:

                                    “Bullying, like other violent or disruptive behavior, is conduct that interferes with students’ ability to learn and teachers’ ability to educate students in a safe environment . . . it is the school’s intent to prevent bullying and to take action to investigate, respond, remediate, and discipline those acts of bullying which have not been successfully prevented.”

                                    This is important not only for kids who get picked on, but if you’re behaving like a bully there should be someone you can talk with to get help. We are all told that if we are bullied – or see someone being bullied – we should talk with our teachers and our parents.

                                    This was something I had to do when a few girls on my bus started teasing and taunting my friends and me. No one was hitting or kicking anyone, but these girls were trying to make us upset, perhaps even provoking us to react with hitting or by crying. They know that their behavior will get them in trouble but they don’t seem to care. We usually try very hard to simply ignore them, though this doesn’t stop them from picking on us.

                                    I have talked to the bus driver, my parents and teachers at the school. They are aware of the problem and are helping me find ways to deal with this problem. Those girls still tease us, but there are now times where it doesn’t bug me as much as it used to. Some of my research for this article contained other ideas and activities to help kids deal with being bullied. This information can be found at the outfront.org and pacer.org websites.

                                    Here are a couple of the ideas I thought were interesting:

                                    Irene Henderson of Eagan, MN knows what it feels like to be bullied. She knows how alone it can make someone feel. So with the help of her mom and her dance studio, Irene created a campaign to show others that they didn’t have to go through what she did alone. She gathered dancers and parents at her studio, decorated lavishly with orange, to share her story and invite everyone to sign a bullying prevention pledge.

                                    Lauren and Victoria Coaxum are teen sisters and the co-founders of Think Before You Type (TBYT) – an anti-cyberbullying and positive self-esteem campaign. They were inspired to start TBYT last summer after seeing a lot of cyberbullying on the Internet, specifically on Twitter. Their mission is to raise awareness about cyberbullying, promote positive self-esteem, and encourage young people to use the Internet for good.

                                    I also liked reading some of the stories that other kids wrote and the videos that they posted about their experiences with bullies and how it has affected them (www.pacer.org/bullying/stories/). Especially the poem, “The Dark Won’t Just Disappear.”

                                    For many students like me, bullying and harassment makes it hard to concentrate in class, interact with others and just enjoy being a kid. Schools should be safe and welcoming for ALL students. Take some time to check out the websites mentioned earlier in this article – on your own or with your friends and parents – to learn about the many things you can do today to change things at your school and across Minnesota!

                                    Frances Copenhaver is the Corcoran News Youth Reporter.

                                    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                    Click here for current edition.

                                    On March 3rd, kids from my school joined hundreds of other kids from the Twin Cities for a rally at the Capitol. We were there to encourage lawmakers to pass the “Safe and Supportive Schools Act” — also known as the anti-bullying bill. This bill will take Minnesota from having the weakest anti-bullying law in the country to the strongest. At the rally there were many kids who held signs that listed how they had been bullied. Not surprising since “11 percent of all kids are bullied weekly; over 30 percent (say) they’re viewed as different.”

                                    When I interviewed Sophie Rothenberger for my article on South High School she was happy that her school had specific policies to prevent bullying. The school also has counselors that the kids can talk with – even the kids who are the bullies. My school also takes this topic very serious. The Southside Family Charter School 2013-2014 Family Handbook includes a section about their Bullying Prohibition Policy:

                                    “Bullying, like other violent or disruptive behavior, is conduct that interferes with students’ ability to learn and teachers’ ability to educate students in a safe environment . . . it is the school’s intent to prevent bullying and to take action to investigate, respond, remediate, and discipline those acts of bullying which have not been successfully prevented.”

                                    This is important not only for kids who get picked on, but if you’re behaving like a bully there should be someone you can talk with to get help. We are all told that if we are bullied – or see someone being bullied – we should talk with our teachers and our parents.

                                    This was something I had to do when a few girls on my bus started teasing and taunting my friends and me. No one was hitting or kicking anyone, but these girls were trying to make us upset, perhaps even provoking us to react with hitting or by crying. They know that their behavior will get them in trouble but they don’t seem to care. We usually try very hard to simply ignore them, though this doesn’t stop them from picking on us.

                                    I have talked to the bus driver, my parents and teachers at the school. They are aware of the problem and are helping me find ways to deal with this problem. Those girls still tease us, but there are now times where it doesn’t bug me as much as it used to. Some of my research for this article contained other ideas and activities to help kids deal with being bullied. This information can be found at the outfront.org and pacer.org websites.

                                    Here are a couple of the ideas I thought were interesting:

                                    Irene Henderson of Eagan, MN knows what it feels like to be bullied. She knows how alone it can make someone feel. So with the help of her mom and her dance studio, Irene created a campaign to show others that they didn’t have to go through what she did alone. She gathered dancers and parents at her studio, decorated lavishly with orange, to share her story and invite everyone to sign a bullying prevention pledge.

                                    Lauren and Victoria Coaxum are teen sisters and the co-founders of Think Before You Type (TBYT) – an anti-cyberbullying and positive self-esteem campaign. They were inspired to start TBYT last summer after seeing a lot of cyberbullying on the Internet, specifically on Twitter. Their mission is to raise awareness about cyberbullying, promote positive self-esteem, and encourage young people to use the Internet for good.

                                    I also liked reading some of the stories that other kids wrote and the videos that they posted about their experiences with bullies and how it has affected them (www.pacer.org/bullying/stories/). Especially the poem, “The Dark Won’t Just Disappear.”

                                    For many students like me, bullying and harassment makes it hard to concentrate in class, interact with others and just enjoy being a kid. Schools should be safe and welcoming for ALL students. Take some time to check out the websites mentioned earlier in this article – on your own or with your friends and parents – to learn about the many things you can do today to change things at your school and across Minnesota!

                                    Frances Copenhaver is the Corcoran News Youth Reporter.

                                    Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                    Click here for current edition.

                                    © 2014 Corcoran News

                                      Corcoran welcomes new Park Recreation Leader

                                      Fri, 2014-04-11 15:54
                                      Corcoran News

                                      Hello my name is Ryan Flanders and I am the new Recreation Leader at Corcoran Recreation Center. I have been a Minneapolis Park Board employee for 15 years with 10 years being full time. I come from a background of Youth Development, Youth Mentorship, and Youth programming that encompassed many communities in Minneapolis. I grew up and live in South Minneapolis (Longfellow Neighborhood), and graduated from South High School in 1997, and from the University Of Minnesota in 2004, GO TIGERS! GO GOPHERS! I enjoy meeting new people, hearing about the community, and possibilities on how WE can make it better!

                                      Corcoran Park is ready and excited for the spring and summer season! There will be many fun programs being offered from pre-school art classes, drum and guitar lessons, Youthline Mentorship opportunities, and field trips to the larger community events as the annual Summer Solstice Festival "Xopantla" in June and the annual Ice Cream Social and Movie in the Park event in July.

                                      Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                      Click here for current edition.

                                      Hello my name is Ryan Flanders and I am the new Recreation Leader at Corcoran Recreation Center. I have been a Minneapolis Park Board employee for 15 years with 10 years being full time. I come from a background of Youth Development, Youth Mentorship, and Youth programming that encompassed many communities in Minneapolis. I grew up and live in South Minneapolis (Longfellow Neighborhood), and graduated from South High School in 1997, and from the University Of Minnesota in 2004, GO TIGERS! GO GOPHERS! I enjoy meeting new people, hearing about the community, and possibilities on how WE can make it better!

                                      Corcoran Park is ready and excited for the spring and summer season! There will be many fun programs being offered from pre-school art classes, drum and guitar lessons, Youthline Mentorship opportunities, and field trips to the larger community events as the annual Summer Solstice Festival "Xopantla" in June and the annual Ice Cream Social and Movie in the Park event in July.

                                      Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                      Click here for current edition.

                                      © 2014 Corcoran News

                                        Home sale: 3132 Longfellow Ave S

                                        Fri, 2014-04-11 15:48
                                        Corcoran News

                                        List Price: $190,000
                                        Contact: Erin Wilson, PRG, Inc.
                                        612-721-7556, ext. 12 or erin [at] prginc [dot] org

                                        This home was recently renovated, with a freshly painted exterior, new roof, boiler, water heater, updated plumbing system, new energy star rated appliances and more! Three bedrooms, and a total of 1300 finished square feet.

                                        Offered through Home Ownership Works Program, which includes income restrictions, owner-occupancy and attendance in a Homebuyer Workshop. Contact Eric for complete terms and conditions.

                                        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                        Click here for current edition.

                                        List Price: $190,000
                                        Contact: Erin Wilson, PRG, Inc.
                                        612-721-7556, ext. 12 or erin [at] prginc [dot] org

                                        This home was recently renovated, with a freshly painted exterior, new roof, boiler, water heater, updated plumbing system, new energy star rated appliances and more! Three bedrooms, and a total of 1300 finished square feet.

                                        Offered through Home Ownership Works Program, which includes income restrictions, owner-occupancy and attendance in a Homebuyer Workshop. Contact Eric for complete terms and conditions.

                                        Contribute, advertise, or learn more about Corcoran News.
                                        Click here for current edition.

                                        © 2014 Corcoran News

                                          Pages